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SMTP servers, sending emails

Hi

I'm making a small application where the user fills in a form, which
when finished is put into a text file, which again is to be mailed to
an address hard-coded in the EXE.

Currently I'm just using my own email account (my ISP provides me with
the opportunity to have like 5-6 addresses I think) so I just created
a new address at my ISP, and then my application uses this account to
log on to my ISP's SMTP server. I tested it, and it works from my home
computer. Will it also work from remote computers not connected thru
the same ISP?

This seems like a rather crude method, but it seems to be working
okay. Are there any other/more elegant ways to do the same thing?

 

Re:SMTP servers, sending emails


Quote
David wrote in message <4b0565f8.0208020610.45b28...@posting.google.com>...
>Hi

>I'm making a small application where the user fills in a form, which
>when finished is put into a text file, which again is to be mailed to
>an address hard-coded in the EXE.

>Currently I'm just using my own email account (my ISP provides me with
>the opportunity to have like 5-6 addresses I think) so I just created
>a new address at my ISP, and then my application uses this account to
>log on to my ISP's SMTP server. I tested it, and it works from my home
>computer. Will it also work from remote computers not connected thru
>the same ISP?

>This seems like a rather crude method, but it seems to be working
>okay. Are there any other/more elegant ways to do the same thing?

Let me get this straight. You're telling all the world, including
the spammers rampant on Usenet, that you have written an application
that contains working authorisation details to a working email server?

I humbly suggest you do _not_ distribute that program in its current
form, and delete that account, *RIGHT NOW*.

Generally, email may be submitted to an SMTP server in two places so
that it will actually be delivered. The first place is on the network
through which you connected. If you dial into the network of a given
ISP, usually you can submit mail to their mail servers, and it will be
relayed. The second place is on the network to which the mail is addressed.
If mail is sent to a domain hosted by a given ISP, usually you can submit
_that_ mail to their mail servers, and it will be delivered. Mark the
difference between locally accepted for relaying, and remotely accepted
for delivery. Especially, mark the difference between accepting all email
because the sender is a registered user, and accepting only that email
for which the received is a registered user.

There are a number of ways to do this, but the simplest and best is
probably to have the program submit all mail, since it all goes to the
same account, directly to an MX for the domain the account is in. MXes
are a DNS thing, you can ask a DNS server who will deliver (not relay)
mail for a given domain.

Groetjes,
Maarten Wiltink

Re:SMTP servers, sending emails


Quote
"Maarten Wiltink" <maar...@kittensandcats.net> wrote in message

news:aieuh2$p79$1@news1.xs4all.nl...
Quote
> David wrote in message

<4b0565f8.0208020610.45b28...@posting.google.com>...

Quote
> >Hi

> >I'm making a small application where the user fills in a form, which
> >when finished is put into a text file, which again is to be mailed to
> >an address hard-coded in the EXE.

> >Currently I'm just using my own email account (my ISP provides me with
> >the opportunity to have like 5-6 addresses I think) so I just created
> >a new address at my ISP, and then my application uses this account to
> >log on to my ISP's SMTP server. I tested it, and it works from my home
> >computer. Will it also work from remote computers not connected thru
> >the same ISP?

> >This seems like a rather crude method, but it seems to be working
> >okay. Are there any other/more elegant ways to do the same thing?

> Let me get this straight. You're telling all the world, including
> the spammers rampant on Usenet, that you have written an application
> that contains working authorisation details to a working email server?

> I humbly suggest you do _not_ distribute that program in its current
> form, and delete that account, *RIGHT NOW*.

> Generally, email may be submitted to an SMTP server in two places so
> that it will actually be delivered. The first place is on the network
> through which you connected. If you dial into the network of a given
> ISP, usually you can submit mail to their mail servers, and it will be
> relayed. The second place is on the network to which the mail is
addressed.
> If mail is sent to a domain hosted by a given ISP, usually you can submit
> _that_ mail to their mail servers, and it will be delivered. Mark the
> difference between locally accepted for relaying, and remotely accepted
> for delivery. Especially, mark the difference between accepting all email
> because the sender is a registered user, and accepting only that email
> for which the received is a registered user.

> There are a number of ways to do this, but the simplest and best is
> probably to have the program submit all mail, since it all goes to the
> same account, directly to an MX for the domain the account is in. MXes
> are a DNS thing, you can ask a DNS server who will deliver (not relay)
> mail for a given domain.

> Groetjes,
> Maarten Wiltink

In Essence...
An Email address  is no different than the address of a favorite web site.

There is a file that contais the filters for the users and users'
preferences
that the said email enters before being forwarded on to the addressee
(This is the later stage of delivery after making all the rounds to the
necessary
DNS servers that eventually resolve the address of the recipient).

One BIG difference between email addresses and web site addresses
is protocol. This is what distinguishes between email and other data
that may not qualify as email.

 As far as the original poster' s dilemma, there is no reason not to use
the current email client(OE/Netscape's EMail  Client...etc)  of the computer
that the application is located on. There are drawbacks of using a remote
computer's
email client such as the GUI will appear unless one knows the
correct parameters of the email client. as to circumvent the actual GUI.

In order to use a particular ISP's Email server, you have to be logged in
and a valid member of the ISP and also assigned an address that is
registered
with INTERNIC.(Which is usually just a random addresss that happens to be
available
at the time of log-on(Dynamic Pooling) but is owned by your ISP).

So...In response to will other remote computers be able to use the same
email server as you do...NO!(At least not with the same log-on info)
....They're on the internet with a valid address also but not in the same
dynamic pool that is available to you through your ISP(unless of course
they happen to be affiliated with the same ISP, however, the log-on
info is associated with that address)

.

Re:SMTP servers, sending emails


Quote
"Nolen" <nol...@attbi.com> wrote in message <news:DpG29.765381$cQ3.117664@sccrnsc01>...

> So...In response to will other remote computers be able to use the same
> email server as you do...NO!(At least not with the same log-on info)
> ....They're on the internet with a valid address also but not in the same
> dynamic pool that is available to you through your ISP(unless of course
> they happen to be affiliated with the same ISP, however, the log-on
> info is associated with that address)

Ok, so I should consider another way to do it then. Is using the
remote user's own email client the only way to go? I'd rather not have
the GUI pop up, that's for sure.. is it very hard to set this thing up
properly?

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