Board index » delphi » tubo pascal vs ansi pascal

tubo pascal vs ansi pascal

Hi.
Could someone tell me what the main differences are between turbo pascal
and ansi pascal?
Also, how do I compile a Pascal source file on UNIX?
(I tried the online UNIX manual but I found nothing)

Thanks.

 

Re:tubo pascal vs ansi pascal


On Wed, 4 Jun 1997 21:01:51 -0230, Neil Zanella <nzane...@cs.mun.ca>
wrote:

Quote
>Hi.
>Could someone tell me what the main differences are between turbo pascal
>and ansi pascal?

I'm not completely up on what's included in ANSI, so some of what I'm
saying here is influenced more by my memories of the original
Jensen/Wirth spec, I may be off base on some of it:

Some of the major LANGUAGE enhancements of Turbo over most standard
Pascals:
1) a compiler supported primitive string type
2) support for separate compilation of non-exectuable library modules
  (AKA Units)
3) the "else" clause in case statments
4) support of multiple and interleaved const/type/var sections
5) support for constant expressions
6) support for "typed constants" (really a type of initialized  
  static variable)
7) last, but most assuredly not least: in v5.5 and later: object
  oriented extensions

There are also many extensions in Turbo (at least the versions
targeted at DOS), that are meant to address working with the PC
hardware, especially the file system and memory.  

If there are specific features you want to know about, Email me and I
can go into more detail.

Quote
>Also, how do I compile a Pascal source file on UNIX?
>(I tried the online UNIX manual but I found nothing)

That will depend on your UNIX setup, first you have to have a UNIX
based Pascal compiler.  There is a GNU-Pascal that supposedly will
compile on most "standard" UNIXs, but I don't know much about it.

Quote
>Thanks.

HTH

Stephen Posey
slpo...@concentric.net

Re:tubo pascal vs ansi pascal


Quote
Neil Zanella (nzane...@cs.mun.ca) wrote:

> Also, how do I compile a Pascal source file on UNIX?
> (I tried the online UNIX manual but I found nothing)

Many UNIXes have a Pascal compiler.  Try `man pc' and/or
`pc myfile.pas -o myfile'.

Or:  Get GNU Pascal, http://home.pages.de/~gnu-pascal/.
It should run on any UNIX, implements ISO Standard Pascal (except
some bugs which are being fixed - watch out for beta releases),
most of ISO Extended Pascal, most of Borland Pascal, plus other
extensions.

Hope this helps,

    Peter

 Dipl.-Phys. Peter Gerwinski, Essen, Germany, free physicist and programmer
peter.gerwin...@uni-essen.de - http://home.pages.de/~peter.gerwinski/ [970201]
 maintainer GNU Pascal [970510] - http://home.pages.de/~gnu-pascal/ [970125]

Re:tubo pascal vs ansi pascal


Quote
In article <3398c71a.4739...@news.concentric.net>, slpo...@concentric.net (Stephen Posey) writes...
>I'm not completely up on what's included in ANSI, so some of what I'm
>saying here is influenced more by my memories of the original
>Jensen/Wirth spec, I may be off base on some of it:

You should get a copy of the Extended Pascal standard.  Its available
online.

Quote

>Some of the major LANGUAGE enhancements of Turbo over most standard
>Pascals:
>1) a compiler supported primitive string type

   Extended Pascal also has a STRING type that provides for a run-time
   defined maximum-length.

Quote
>2) support for separate compilation of non-exectuable library modules
>  (AKA Units)

   Extended Pascal provides MODULEs that have INTERFACE and IMPLEMENTATION
   parts.

Quote
>3) the "else" clause in case statments

   Extended Pascal has an OTHERWISE clause on CASE statements.

Quote
>4) support of multiple and interleaved const/type/var sections

   Extended Pascal provides this.

Quote
>5) support for constant expressions

   Extended Pascal provides this.

Quote
>6) support for "typed constants" (really a type of initialized  
>  static variable)

   You can kinda get the same thing with initialized variables pulled
   in from another module.

Quote
>7) last, but most assuredly not least: in v5.5 and later: object
>  oriented extensions

   The Pascal standards committee (X3J9) has produced an Object Oriented
   Extensions to Pascal technical report.  A technical report is an official
   standards document, but its wording is more informal than that of the
   standard itself.

--
John Reagan
DEC Pascal Project Leader
Application Compilers and Environments
Digital Equipment Corporation
X3J9 Secretary
rea...@hiyall.enet.dec.com
Disclaimer:  The opinions and statements expressed by me are not
             necessarily those of Digital Equipment Corporation.
--

Other Threads