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Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over


2005-08-02 08:30:04 PM
delphi111
Dan Barclay writes:
Quote
I've got one here on my desk, but it is been a while since I used it.
It's a Post Versalog in a genuine NerdIdentity leather holster with
snap on belt clip.
My dad and my mother have a running argument as to whether or not he
ever carried his slide rules in a belt holster in college. He swears
not; she insists he did....
--
Craig Stuntz [TeamB] . Vertex Systems Corp. . Columbus, OH
Delphi/InterBase Weblog : blogs.teamb.com/craigstuntz
Useful articles about InterBase development:
blogs.teamb.com/craigstuntz/category/21.aspx
 
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

Kirk Halgren writes:
Quote
If you understand how they work (adding logs of the multiplicands and
converting them back to the product) you have a deeper understanding
of how numbers work.
Right. A slide rule is at bottom a log table highly compressed for
space. Knowing how to use it is no better today than knowing how to use
any other log table. But knowing how to use logs is useful.
--
Craig Stuntz [TeamB] . Vertex Systems Corp. . Columbus, OH
Delphi/InterBase Weblog : blogs.teamb.com/craigstuntz
IB 6 versions prior to 6.0.1.6 are pre-release and may corrupt
your DBs! Open Edition users, get 6.0.1.6 from mers.com
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

Kirk Halgren writes:
Quote
With
calculators most students will blithely write 6 or 8 digits, never
realizing that with three significant digit inputs you get only 2
significant digits out. All the rest are purely ornamental.
True. I have owned a lot of calculators in my life, from cheap freebies
to higher-end HPs. I have used MatLab, MathCAD, and other software-based
math systems. And I can not think of one of them which would (by default,
anyway) show you precision in the answer based on the precision of
operands you entered. Odd.
--
Craig Stuntz [TeamB] . Vertex Systems Corp. . Columbus, OH
Delphi/InterBase Weblog : blogs.teamb.com/craigstuntz
Everything You Need to Know About InterBase Character Sets:
blogs.teamb.com/craigstuntz/articles/403.aspx
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

"Eric Grange" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes
Quote
>This takes me back....

Amstrad CPC 464 machine was the first computer I owned... and the last one
where I knew exactly what each of the components did, how they worked and
how to program them to accomplish what they weren't meant for. Wrote my
first
compiler (BASIC to Z80 machine code) on it... *feels old*

Eric
I had a CPC 464 as well - what a marvellous machine! It certainly beat the
c..p out of the C64 *grins and deliberate nod to the 8-bit format flame wars
of the late 80s and early 90s*
Best,
Dave
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

"Dave Nottage [TeamB]" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>wrote in
message news:42ee37dc$XXXX@XXXXX.COM...
Quote
Oliver Townshend writes:

>>>Is there a CLR for the Amiga?
>>
>>Its not next to the BkSpc key by any chance?
>
>No, its the basic command that clears the screen.

I thought that was CLS.

Could be both. Certainly in Locomotive Basic (used in the Amstrad CPC), CLS
was used to clear the main screen as a whole but CLR could be used to clear
a specified graphics window within that main screen.
Best,
Dave
Quote
--
Dave Nottage [TeamB]
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

"Angra Mainyu" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes
Quote

"Dan Barclay" wrote
>
>Then there were the early Compaq "sewing machine" portables.
>I seemed to have 'em all at one time or another.
>My right arm is still an inch longer than my left<g>.

Yeah me too but mine is longer 'cause I walked 5 miles through deep snow
to
school carrying stone tablets, we was so backward we didn't have no fancy
books
much less book bags.
Books? You were lucky! We had to make do with writing down our homework on
our arms and legs, using pens that didn't have any ink!
*ducks and runs off in the direction of a certain well-known comedy classic*
Best,
Dave
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

"Craig Stuntz [TeamB]" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM [a.k.a. acm.org]>wrote
in message news:42ef67bd$XXXX@XXXXX.COM...
Quote
Kirk Halgren writes:

>If you understand how they work (adding logs of the multiplicands and
>converting them back to the product) you have a deeper understanding
>of how numbers work.

Right. A slide rule is at bottom a log table highly compressed for
space. Knowing how to use it is no better today than knowing how to use
any other log table. But knowing how to use logs is useful.
Well, you never know when a certain bit of knowledge will come in handy. As
a {*word*249}ager, prior to calculators, I had a paper route and invented a
circular slide rule to compute the prorated charges for my customers based
on their vacation. That didn't even involve logs, just slide rules
automating multiplication and subtraction operations, but the inputs were
the starting and ending days of the vacation. The output was the exact
monthly charge.
Years later, as a production engineer for a hot tubs factory, I made a major
improvement to our production line by combining the jointer operation into
the tongue and groove cutting operation. This saved time for any staves
which inspection showed needed jointing, but also straightened every piece.
If I hadn't learned how to tune up a jointer (a precision setup task which
many woodworkers dread) I couldn't have invented that improvement. I also
learned exactly how the jointer straightens. The change in the shaper setup
was minor (.044" recess of the infeed fence) but it had never occurred to
anyone else.
Industry standard was 1-3 weeks of seepage (many gallons) but our tubs
leaked a few quarts over hours. One even sealed in 20 minutes. The looks
on the faces of the installation crew were priceless. :Kirk, what did you
DO to that tub?"
There is no substitute for a deep understanding based on fundamental
operating principles.
--
Kirk Halgren
"Inventing is a combination of brains and materials. The more brains you
use, the less material you need."
--Charles Franklin Kettering, inventor of the battery ignition and the
electrical starter.
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

Craig Stuntz [TeamB] writes:
Quote
But knowing how to use logs is useful.
That's a good point.
--
Nick Hodges -- TeamB
Lemanix Corporation -- www.lemanix.com
Read my Blog -- www.lemanix.com/nick
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

"Nick Hodges [TeamB]" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes
Quote
Craig Stuntz [TeamB] writes:

>But knowing how to use logs is useful.

That's a good point.
Especially when you're lost in the wilderness.
--
Download Blackbird Crow Raven's book
"STILL CASTING SHADOWS: Two American Families 1620-2006"
(.exe and .pdf): cc.borland.com/ccweb.exe/listing
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

Dave Moore writes:
Quote
Could be both. Certainly in Locomotive Basic (used in the Amstrad CPC),
CLS was used to clear the main screen as a whole but CLR could be used to
clear a specified graphics window within that main screen.
To be fair to the OS/2 branch, it was Home there, wasn't it?
-Brion
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

Kirk Halgren writes:
Quote
There is no substitute for a deep understanding based on fundamental
operating principles.
Even if this has relatively little to do with Delphi or computing, it is a
fascinating story, and very well related to computing in general. A
thorough understanding of the problem space, resources, and desired
outcome are all valuable in getting an optimal solution out the door.
-Brion
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

"Nick Hodges [TeamB]" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>wrote in news:42ef8465$1
@newsgroups.borland.com:
Quote
Craig Stuntz [TeamB] writes:

>But knowing how to use logs is useful.

That's a good point.

A case in point! When God told all the animals to "go forth and multiply",
he later checked and found that all of the animals, except for one species
of snake had complied. The snakes that had not complied excused themselves
because, they said: "we are just adders!" So God relented, and placed the
errant snakes in a forest with a lot of fallen trees and taught them to
beat on the fallen trees with their tails because, as God said: even adders
can multiply with log rythyms. <gd&r>
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

Larry --
<groan>
Sounds like one of those jokes your high school teacher would tell you.
--
Nick Hodges -- TeamB
Lemanix Corporation -- www.lemanix.com
Read my Blog -- www.lemanix.com/nick
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

Dan Barclay writes:
Quote
Then there were the early Compaq "sewing machine" portables.
I think Danny still has one in his office. I had one w/ a Bernoulli box
peripheral for a couple years ...
--
John Kaster blogs.borland.com/johnk
Features and bugs: qc.borland.com
Get source: cc.borland.com
If it is not here, it is not happening: ec.borland.com
 

Re: Wake me up when this dotNET experiment is over

"Larry Drews" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes
Quote
"Nick Hodges [TeamB]" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>wrote in news:42ef8465$1
@newsgroups.borland.com:

>Craig Stuntz [TeamB] writes:
>
>>But knowing how to use logs is useful.
>
>That's a good point.
>

A case in point! When God told all the animals to "go forth and
multiply",
he later checked and found that all of the animals, except for one species
of snake had complied. The snakes that had not complied excused
themselves
because, they said: "we are just adders!" So God relented, and placed the
errant snakes in a forest with a lot of fallen trees and taught them to
beat on the fallen trees with their tails because, as God said: even
adders
can multiply with log rythyms. <gd&r>
Did you just make that up now?
BTW, do you know how some snakes multiply? In a group ball, with the males
using one phallus on either side. Makes Mormons look positively Victorian.
See:
www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FRO/is_n6_v130/ai_20088422
"research confirms the observation of British social critic George Bernard
Shaw: that sex is an activity so absurd and undignified, it proves the
Creator has a sense of humor. As each female garter emerges from
hibernation, she is greeted by a gauntlet of randy males. The males wake
earlier to wait for potential mates. They pile onto and around each female,
forming a mating ball of up to 100 snakes. Outnumbered 99 to I, the
unfortunate female may be smothered or crushed by her suitors. "
"Operationally, God is beginning to resemble not a ruler but the last fading
smile of a cosmic Cheshire cat."
-- Sir Julian Huxley