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ASCII table

Is it possible by any means to extend the ascii table to about 999
characters?
 

Re:ASCII table


Quote
Postman wrote:

> Is it possible by any means to extend the ascii table to about 999
> characters?

TWO serious misunderstandings.

The Ascii code is standardized, it cannot be extended by individuals.
The name implies: American Standard Code for Information Interchange.
This is the principal point.

The technical point is: Ascii usually is restricted to 7 bits, so
a maximum of 128 characters can be in the code list. The PC used the
available 8'th bit to extend the PC character set to 256 characters,
but unfortunately in a very silly way.

To get more different characters you should consider variable fonts
and character sets, as they are used for example with Windows.

But I am sure that you wanted a very distinct answer. I will not
give it, because I am a fan of the correct words!
--
Franz Glaser, Glasau 3, A-4191 Vorderweissenbach Austria ++43-7219-7035
Muehlviertler Elektronik Glaser. Industrial control and instrumentation
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Re:ASCII table


In article <7e0g30$2ir...@nnrp01.iafrica.com>,

Quote
Postman <iva...@webmail.co.za> wrote:
>Is it possible by any means to extend the ascii table to about 999
>characters?

What on earth do you mean? Sure you can use as many characters as you
please provided you choose proper type, like word, and define those
characters in the output devices.

Osmo

Quote

Re:ASCII table


In article <3703E898.499FC...@eunet.at>,
  "Ing. Franz Glaser" <meg-gla...@eunet.at> wrote:

Quote
> Postman wrote:

> > Is it possible by any means to extend the ascii table to about 999
> > characters?

> TWO serious misunderstandings.

> The Ascii code is standardized, it cannot be extended by individuals.
> The name implies: American Standard Code for Information Interchange.
> This is the principal point.

> The technical point is: Ascii usually is restricted to 7 bits, so
> a maximum of 128 characters can be in the code list. The PC used the
> available 8'th bit to extend the PC character set to 256 characters,
> but unfortunately in a very silly way.

> To get more different characters you should consider variable fonts
> and character sets, as they are used for example with Windows.

> But I am sure that you wanted a very distinct answer. I will not
> give it, because I am a fan of the correct words!

me too:  ASCII, not Ascii

.

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Re:ASCII table


Quote
netn...@altavista.net wrote:
> me too:  ASCII, not Ascii

This is true, but has educational and historical reasons. At least here
in Europe many people named it Ah Es Ce Two, because the two II are
often erroneously treated as a roman 2. This is why I began to prefer
the lowercase writing many years ago to avoid this error.
--
Franz Glaser, Glasau 3, A-4191 Vorderweissenbach Austria ++43-7219-7035
Muehlviertler Elektronik Glaser. Industrial control and instrumentation
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
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Re:ASCII table


In article <3704EE14.B83EA...@eunet.at>,
  "Ing. Franz Glaser" <meg-gla...@eunet.at> wrote:

Quote
> netn...@altavista.net wrote:

> > me too:  ASCII, not Ascii

> This is true, but has educational and historical reasons. At least here
> in Europe many people named it Ah Es Ce Two, because the two II are
> often erroneously treated as a roman 2. This is why I began to prefer
> the lowercase writing many years ago to avoid this error.

so 2 wrongs DO make a right!

.

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Re:ASCII table


JRS:  In article <7e0vbq$...@kruuna.Helsinki.FI> of Fri, 2 Apr 1999
02:26:50 in news:comp.lang.pascal.borland, Osmo Ronkanen

Quote
<ronka...@cc.helsinki.fi> wrote:
>In article <7e0g30$2ir...@nnrp01.iafrica.com>,
>Postman <iva...@webmail.co.za> wrote:
>>Is it possible by any means to extend the ascii table to about 999
>>characters?

>What on earth do you mean? Sure you can use as many characters as you
>please provided you choose proper type, like word, and define those
>characters in the output devices.

It has already been done - seek information on Unicode.  There is
Unicode support in Delphi 3 and, AIUI, Windows NT.  The first 256
Unicode characters are said to be the ANSI set.

--
 ? John Stockton, Surrey, UK.  j...@merlyn.demon.co.uk   Turnpike v4.00   MIME. ?
  Web <URL: http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - TP/BP/&c. FAQqish topics & links.
  Timo's TurboPascal <A HREF="ftp://garbo.uwasa.fi/pc/link/tsfaqp.zip">FAQ</A>.
  <A HREF="http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/clpb-faq.txt">Mini-FAQ</A> of c.l.p.b.

Re:ASCII table


Quote
In article <7e39h5$12...@nnrp1.dejanews.com>,  <netn...@altavista.net> wrote:
>In article <3704EE14.B83EA...@eunet.at>,
>  "Ing. Franz Glaser" <meg-gla...@eunet.at> wrote:
>> netn...@altavista.net wrote:

>> > me too:  ASCII, not Ascii

>> This is true, but has educational and historical reasons. At least here
>> in Europe many people named it Ah Es Ce Two, because the two II are
>> often erroneously treated as a roman 2. This is why I began to prefer
>> the lowercase writing many years ago to avoid this error.

>so 2 wrongs DO make a right!

I think Ascii in lower case is perfectly valid, especially if one means
character sets based on ASCII in general and not just the original set
of 128 codes. The word ascii has become a general word like scuba or
laser and there is no need to use upper case.

Osmo

Re:ASCII table


Quote
In article <3704EE14.B83EA...@eunet.at> meg-gla...@eunet.at wrote...
> This is true, but has educational and historical reasons. At least here
> in Europe many people named it Ah Es Ce Two, because the two II are
> often erroneously treated as a roman 2.

'Many people'? You're the first I've heard!

Mike{*word*106}son, Black Cat Software Factory, Edinburgh, Scotland
fax 0131-271-1551 - Columnated Ruins Domino - Mellotron M400 #996

Re:ASCII table


Quote
Mike{*word*106}son wrote:

> In article <3704EE14.B83EA...@eunet.at> meg-gla...@eunet.at wrote...

> > This is true, but has educational and historical reasons. At least here
> > in Europe many people named it Ah Es Ce Two, because the two II are
> > often erroneously treated as a roman 2.

> 'Many people'? You're the first I've heard!

> Mike{*word*106}son, Black Cat Software Factory, Edinburgh, Scotland
> fax 0131-271-1551 - Columnated Ruins Domino - Mellotron M400 #996

Is it possible that I have heared more people than you in the last
- say - 30+ years of experience? Is it possible that native English
speaking people have less problems with misspelling English words
and abbreviations? I am not sure that I ever heared Ah Es Ce Two from
native English speaking people, but I remember many Germans, Finnish,
Belgian, Czech, Hungarian, Norwegian, French (unsorted) etc. Especially
on fairs and on the telephone.
:-))

On the other hand: Is it an English (GB) or an American (US)
property that abbreviations MUST be written with uppercase letters?
As Osmo wrote, the abbreviation has become so commonly used that
it is no longer an abbreviation, like radar etc.
--
Franz Glaser, Glasau 3, A-4191 Vorderweissenbach Austria ++43-7219-7035
Muehlviertler Elektronik Glaser. Industrial control and instrumentation
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
http://members.eunet.at/meg-glaser           mailto:meg-gla...@eunet.at
http://www.geocities.com/~franzglaser  http://members.xoom.com/f_glaser

Re:ASCII table


Quote
In article <3706138B.EABB6...@eunet.at> meg-gla...@eunet.at wrote...
> Is it possible that I have heared more people than you in the last
> - say - 30+ years of experience?

Dunno - I'm not clairvoyant.

Quote
> I am not sure that I ever heared Ah Es Ce Two from native English
> speaking people, but I remember many Germans, Finnish, Belgian, Czech,
> Hungarian, Norwegian, French (unsorted) etc. Especially on fairs and on
> the telephone. :-))

My company employs people from at least half the countries you mentioned
(not all of whom are native English speakers) and I've yet to hear any
of them refer to ASCII as 'ACS-2'.

Quote
> On the other hand: Is it an English (GB) or an American (US)
> property that abbreviations MUST be written with uppercase letters?

It's a grammatical convention.

Mike{*word*106}son, Black Cat Software Factory, Edinburgh, Scotland
fax 0131-271-1551 - Columnated Ruins Domino - Mellotron M400 #996

Re:ASCII table


In article <fLDJPlAp7OB3E...@merlyn.demon.co.uk>, Dr John Stockton
<j...@merlyn.demon.co.uk> writes

Quote
>It has already been done - seek information on Unicode.  There is
>Unicode support in Delphi 3 and, AIUI, Windows NT.  The first 256
>Unicode characters are said to be the ANSI set.

My answer exactly! Thanks be that I actually followed this thread this
far before chipping-in myself! ASCII is ASCII (however you spell it) and
that's 128 fixed characters period (including period). Unicode provides
the extension you seek (with the ASCII/ANSI set down the bottom end for
compatibility). Check "Java" for an example of Unicode in practice...

--
Marcus Morris - South Croydon, LONDON, UK (Mar...@ntos.demon.co.uk)

Re:ASCII table


Just to add an anecdote on the other side:

I grew up on the Canadian Prairies during the 70's and Ass-Key-Two is the
ONLY way I every heard it pronounced.  (Not that I heard it very often.)

Also, sadly, I very seldom see it written out in full - to the point where
I have trouble remembering exactly what it stands for.  I guess that would
be an arguement in favor of lower case, but I'll continue to use capitals.

Re:ASCII table


Quote
Rob Morewood wrote:

> Just to add an anecdote on the other side:

> I grew up on the Canadian Prairies during the 70's and Ass-Key-Two is the
> ONLY way I every heard it pronounced.  (Not that I heard it very often.)

> Also, sadly, I very seldom see it written out in full - to the point where
> I have trouble remembering exactly what it stands for.  I guess that would
> be an arguement in favor of lower case, but I'll continue to use capitals.

I'm probably not 100% correct, but I think it is
American Standard Code for Information Interchange

Bob Schor
[If you think saying "ASCII" is bad, try pronoucing "EBCDIC"]

Re:ASCII table


Quoting a message by Bob Schor <bsc...@vms.cis.pitt.edu> in
comp.lang.pascal.borland:

Quote
>I'm probably not 100% correct, but I think it is
>American Standard Code for Information Interchange

Sounds about right to me.

Quote
>[If you think saying "ASCII" is bad, try pronoucing "EBCDIC"]

I'm not sure how it's supposed to be prounounced, but I've always said
"ass-key". {shrug}

As for the second one - I do beleive I'd pronounce it "E-B-C-D-I-C" :>

--

= Stewart Honsberger (AKA Blackdeath)
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