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InterBase 6.1 on NT

Hello,

When running InterBase on a local LAN Windows NT system. If the NT server is
a dual processor and there are several queries taking place at the same
time. Does the NT box know to switch a process to another processor if one
is busy.

Randy

 

Re:InterBase 6.1 on NT


Interbase typically runs slower on a dual processor machine than on a single
processor machine. There is a program called IB_Affinity available at
http://www.ait-augsburg.de/downloads.htm that will attache IB to one
processor to avoid the performance hit.

--
Bill

Re:InterBase 6.1 on NT


Quote
"Bill Todd (TeamB)" wrote:
> Interbase typically runs slower on a dual processor machine than on a single
> processor machine.

Is it true for Classic on Linux too?

Re:InterBase 6.1 on NT


Quote
"Ded" <d...@hq.bereg.net> wrote in message

news:3AAFBE3E.6896DC24@hq.bereg.net...

Quote
> "Bill Todd (TeamB)" wrote:

> > Interbase typically runs slower on a dual processor machine than on a
single
> > processor machine.

> Is it true for Classic on Linux too?

No. Only the SuperServer architecture suffers from this problem. Classic
works fine and takes advantage of multiple processors.

--

Martijn Tonies
Upscene Productions
http://www.upscene.com

InterBase Workbench - the developer tool for InterBase
http://www.interbaseworkbench.com

Re:InterBase 6.1 on NT


Quote
Martijn Tonies wrote:
> No. Only the SuperServer architecture suffers from this problem. Classic
> works fine and takes advantage of multiple processors.

  Thank you, it's fine that I was frightened by only innacurate sentence.

Re:InterBase 6.1 on NT


Quote
Rand Monroe wrote in message <3aafb0e4$1_2@dnews>...

>When running InterBase on a local LAN Windows NT system. If the NT
server is
>a dual processor and there are several queries taking place at the same
>time. Does the NT box know to switch a process to another processor if
one
>is busy.

Unfortunately, for NT, IB doesn't currently get along with
multi-processor setups. NT ends up swapping all IB threads back and
forth across processors effectively cutting performance close to half
instead of doubling it. If run as an executable instead of a service,
you can pin it to a processor via Task Manager, or for a service you can
use IB_Affinity, but in both cases this has to be done everytime IB
starts.

--
Wayne Niddery (WinWright Inc.)
RADBooks - http://members.home.net/wniddery/RADBooks/delphibooks.html
"At the apex of every great tragedy of mankind there stands the figure
of an incorruptible altruist" - Ayn Rand

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