Board index » delphi » Delphi 6 for HTTPS and system tray

Delphi 6 for HTTPS and system tray

Hello all,

I am considering using Borland Delphi to write a small Windows
application, and was hoping you could confirm if it can be used to
quickly develop it and that it has the proper libraries.

It needs to do this:

1) Reside in the system tray
2) Periodically poll a web site using HTTPS, and preferably verify the
server certificate of the site
3) Run Adobe Acrobat Reader on content retrieved from the web site

The important parts are the HTTPS and system tray support, I believe.

Does Delphi have a library for doing these built in? Which version of
Delphi (Personal, Professional, Enterprise) would I need to do this?

Many thanks,

Doug

 

Re:Delphi 6 for HTTPS and system tray


Quote
Doug wrote in message ...
>Hello all,

>I am considering using Borland Delphi to write a small Windows
>application, and was hoping you could confirm if it can be used to
>quickly develop it and that it has the proper libraries.

>It needs to do this:

>1) Reside in the system tray
>2) Periodically poll a web site using HTTPS, and preferably verify the
>server certificate of the site
>3) Run Adobe Acrobat Reader on content retrieved from the web site

>The important parts are the HTTPS and system tray support, I believe.

>Does Delphi have a library for doing these built in? Which version of
>Delphi (Personal, Professional, Enterprise) would I need to do this?

I'm speaking from a slightly outdated viewpoint; I'm still
working with Delphi 3.

Libraries are not built-in, although they can be linked into
the executable. Third-party libraries are widely available.

System tray components can be downloaded, often as freeware
with source, from the many Delphi websites. Internet components
are included with Delphi, although I think those aren't very
well thought of (I'm referring to the NetMaster components).
The ICS, Indy, and Fran?ois Piette's components seem to be
appreciated more (some of these may be the same, I'm not at
all familiar with any of them).

Running external executables can be done trivially through
Windows shell functions (the complete WinAPI is accessible);
this also allows opening documents in their associated
programs.

Groetjes,
Maarten Wiltink

Other Threads