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The end of programming, once again.


2004-06-11 03:42:39 AM
cppbuilder0
Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
full of buzzwords...
www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html
I'm sure the tool is expensive enough that if they convince a dozen
gullible executives the thing will pay back.
--
Oscar
 
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

"Oscar Fuentes" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote

Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
full of buzzwords...

www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html

I'm sure the tool is expensive enough that if they convince a dozen
gullible executives the thing will pay back.

--
Oscar
Oscar, I find it hilarious also. Just think by this theory if someone buys
ACCPAC they are now a registered accountant. All I have to do is buy
Mathematica by Wolfram and I am a Mathematician. :-) The executive who buys
that should be fired on the spot, for incompetience or because BYOB comes a
lot cheaper.
Tom
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

It can even produce code for the "Linuz" OS ;-)
Oscar Fuentes wrote:

{smallsort}

Re:The end of programming, once again.

Great!
It used to be a regular thing for about every year some small company
would announce a new compression algorithm dramatically better than
anything else only to eventually turn out to be that they were going
to zip up a zip file and zip that again, etc. They seem to never
check the actual compression when they do that. After a while enough
people caught on to the game so this doesn't happen any more.
Now we've got software replacing programmers, a fine substitute and
almost as credible as the ziping the zip file boys. <g>
. Ed
Quote
Oscar Fuentes wrote in message
news: XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...

Again, a company claims that its tool creates software
a trillion times faster and programmers are no longer
needed. Cool acronyms, lousy scientific studies, photos
of happy people, technical papers full of buzzwords...

www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html

I'm sure the tool is expensive enough that if they convince
a dozen gullible executives the thing will pay back.
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

Oscar Fuentes < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:
Quote
Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
full of buzzwords...

www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html
The next Miracle: Managers with Brains !
:-)
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

"Tom" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:
Quote
All I have to do is buy
Mathematica by Wolfram and I am a Mathematician.
Shucks ! Does that mean that if I do 2 + 2 = 4 on Mathematica,
I am not a mathematician ?
Stephen Wolfram will have to give me back my money !
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

Boian Mitov < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:
Quote
It can even produce code for the "Linuz" OS ;-)

Fuzzy Kool Kode for Linuz
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

"I R T" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
"Tom" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:

>All I have to do is buy
>Mathematica by Wolfram and I am a Mathematician.

Shucks ! Does that mean that if I do 2 + 2 = 4 on Mathematica,
I am not a mathematician ?

Stephen Wolfram will have to give me back my money !
I guess buying Autocad won't make me an engineer either. You mean you
actually do get something from 8 years of study who would have guessed. :-)
Tom
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

"Oscar Fuentes" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote

Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
full of buzzwords...

www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html

I'm sure the tool is expensive enough that if they convince a dozen
gullible executives the thing will pay back.

My first reaction was to see if the article was written on April,1st. Well,
it wasn't. If it were it could have had some entertainment value.
Quote
>>"In ten years we will laugh about the fact that we still had to write
code at the beginning of the 21st century. It is about time to automate the
software industry," says Oscar Pastor, who developed the "programming
machine"
I'm laughing already. What is amazing is that somebody would even think of
publishing this hogwash. It's really laughable to think that a "programming
machine" can ever take over what is exclusively human activity, requiring
creativity and intuition, similar to writing books, music, painting, etc.
They should have read at least this chapter
(www.informit.com/articles/article.asp from
excellent Robert Glass' book on software engineering before printing such
nonsense.
J
-------------------------------------------------------
Fact 1
The most important factor in software work is not the tools and techniques
used by the programmers, but rather the quality of the programmers
themselves.
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

Oscar Fuentes wrote:
Quote
Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
full of buzzwords...

www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html

I'm sure the tool is expensive enough that if they convince a dozen
gullible executives the thing will pay back.

They are not alone: www.omg.org/mda/
Cheers,
--
Nicola Musatti
Team Thai Kingdom
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

"Nicola Musatti" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
Oscar Fuentes wrote:
>Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
>times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
>lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
>full of buzzwords...
>
>www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html
>
>I'm sure the tool is expensive enough that if they convince a dozen
>gullible executives the thing will pay back.
>

They are not alone: www.omg.org/mda/

Cheers,
--
Nicola Musatti
Team Thai Kingdom
It sounds like a terrific product, and it does not seem to say that it will
take the place of an experienced programmer. We were making fun of the news
story; because, it was implying that the software could replace an
experienced programmer. What your product seems to be is a really nice
advance in RAD technology. I appreciate you bringing this product to my
attention.
Tom
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

"Tom" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote

"Nicola Musatti" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
news:40c95451$ XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...
>Oscar Fuentes wrote:
>>Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
>>times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
>>lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
>>full of buzzwords...
>>
>>www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html
>>
>>I'm sure the tool is expensive enough that if they convince a dozen
>>gullible executives the thing will pay back.
>>
>
>They are not alone: www.omg.org/mda/
>
>Cheers,
>--
>Nicola Musatti
>Team Thai Kingdom

It sounds like a terrific product, and it does not seem to say that it
will
take the place of an experienced programmer. We were making fun of the
news
story; because, it was implying that the software could replace an
experienced programmer. What your product seems to be is a really nice
advance in RAD technology. I appreciate you bringing this product to my
attention.
Efforts in finding ways to increase software design abstraction level and
reuse "in the large" go for 50 years. It's became especially popular field
of study for the last 20 years, when many publications were produced and
lots of research was done. Probably every second Phd in computer science is
written on some variation of this topic. There is UML, there are several
formal specification languages, modeling languages, constraint languages,
FSM languages, and everything in between. There were lots of hype in the
past and there is no reasons to believe that the hype machine will ever
stop. The truth is that we are no better in solving those problems now than
we were 20 years ago. The narrower the scope of the problem the better
success can be achieved in that field. Unfortunately, the former defeats the
latter. And I think people are looking for the answers in all the wrong
places, it's more of a philosophical question about the whole concept of
human intellectual activities that do not allow broad generalization.
J
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Reuse "in the large" is and always has been an unsolved problem. In spite of
the enthusiasm of the components crowd, finding in a library of components
the precise one that will solve your problem at hand is nearly an impossible
task
(www.stickyminds.com/sitewide.asp
&ObjectType=COL)
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

Oscar Fuentes wrote:
Quote

Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
full of buzzwords...

www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html

I'm sure the tool is expensive enough that if they convince a dozen
gullible executives the thing will pay back.

I have a cold fusion machine for sale - only needs 1 litre of water a day
and gives out 1 gigawatt power continuous - yours for only $9.95 (or your
money back) :-)
Trouble is with these people is that they make these claims and say that it
is everybody elses responsibility to prove them wrong, rather than their
own responsibility to prove that (and I mean PROVE) their claims are
correct.
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

john blackburn wrote:
Quote
Oscar Fuentes wrote:
>Again, a company claims that its tool creates software a trillion
>times faster and programmers are no longer needed. Cool acronyms,
>lousy scientific studies, photos of happy people, technical papers
>full of buzzwords...
>
>www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20040607_160114.html
Trouble is with these people is that they make these claims and say that it
is everybody elses responsibility to prove them wrong, rather than their
own responsibility to prove that (and I mean PROVE) their claims are
correct.
If the tool worked so incredibly well they wouldn't even need to sell it. They could
just generate applications using it and then sell the applications.
 

Re:The end of programming, once again.

Randall Parker wrote:
Quote
If the tool worked so incredibly well they wouldn't even need to sell it. They could
just generate applications using it and then sell the applications.
Indeed. Other than leasing the program on a per use basis, your suggestion is the only
profitable way to go. Their own program would program them out of business in no time if
they sold it staight out.
Seriously, though, trailers have had some influence on the housing market. And some
trailers are considered homes by some, even though they are not original creations. So
some of the stuff cranked out could be of some value, or have some effect; Like spitting
in the ocean in South Carolina USA might raise the water level on a beach in France. You
just probably won't notice it, or be able to measure it.
Not to start that whole measurement thing again though :-).