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Licensing


2004-01-07 05:35:14 PM
cppbuilder60
I'm starting to sell my app next month. How can I implement registration
codes for my app? To track which company bougth my app.
 
 

Re:Licensing

You can check out MJFSecurity from www.mjfreelancing.com - Security
components designed exclusively for C++Builder.
--
---
Malcolm Smith
MJ Freelancing
www.mjfreelancing.com
Borland Technology Partner
"Oliver Young" <none>wrote in message
Quote

I'm starting to sell my app next month. How can I implement
registration
codes for my app? To track which company bougth my app.


 

Re:Licensing

I'm not sure if I'm in the right newsgroup. Do you have any licensing option
that will allow my company to use delphi.net prof on an unlimited basis? I'm
planning to have more than 20 programmers this year and its quite annoying
to buy one everytime there's a newcomer.
E. Taurian
 

{smallsort}

Re:Licensing

E. Taurian wrote:
Quote
I'm not sure if I'm in the right newsgroup. Do you have any licensing
option that will allow my company to use delphi.net prof on an
unlimited basis? I'm planning to have more than 20 programmers this
year and its quite annoying to buy one everytime there's a newcomer.
License the copies to the company, not the developer. So you own 20
copies. Then one one leaves, you can reinstall. As far as I know thats
within the licensing as the company is the owner, not the developer.
--
Liz the Brit
Delphi things I have released: www.xcalibur.co.uk/DelphiThings
 

Re:Licensing

On Thu, 25 Jan 2007 16:09:22 +0800, E. Taurian wrote:
Quote
I'm not sure if I'm in the right newsgroup. Do you have any licensing option
that will allow my company to use delphi.net prof on an unlimited basis? I'm
planning to have more than 20 programmers this year and its quite annoying
to buy one everytime there's a newcomer.
I suggest you contact a Borland Sales Representative (by phone) and
discuss the licensing options available.
--
Marc Rohloff [TeamB]
marc rohloff -at- myrealbox -dot- com
 

Re:Licensing

Hey all,
A certain company supplies a set of source-code to anyone who registers
for free on their website, but their license only allows you to
redistribute binaries based on their code, and not the source-code
itself. If you made DIFF patches that transformed their original code
into your modified version, and distributed only those, would that be legal?
Cheers,
Nicholas Sherlock
 

Re:Licensing

Hi,
Why dont you send the patches (with comments to why you think they are
important) to the company and ask for them to be included in next release of
their product?
best regards
Kim Madsen
TeamC4D
"Nicholas Sherlock" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
Hey all,

A certain company supplies a set of source-code to anyone who registers
for free on their website, but their license only allows you to
redistribute binaries based on their code, and not the source-code itself.
If you made DIFF patches that transformed their original code into your
modified version, and distributed only those, would that be legal?

Cheers,
Nicholas Sherlock
 

Re:Licensing

Nicholas Sherlock wrote:
Quote
A certain company supplies a set of source-code to anyone who
registers for free on their website
Out of curiosity, what is the company and what does the source code do?
--
Regards,
Bruce McGee
Glooscap Software
 

Re:Licensing

Bruce McGee wrote:
Quote
Nicholas Sherlock wrote:

>A certain company supplies a set of source-code to anyone who
>registers for free on their website

Out of curiosity, what is the company and what does the source code do?
It's Atmel, the microcontroller company. The source-code is a
demonstration of their USB-enabled microcontroller, it emulates a USB
keyboard and types out the spec for the chip when you press a button on
the circuit board.
The source-code can be downloaded for free, if you register, but can't
be redistributed.
Cheers,
Nicholas Sherlock
 

Re:Licensing

I'd be very careful with that. What you can do would depend on the
specifics of the license, and you'd need a lawyer competent in software
licensing to figure it out.
I Am Not A Lawyer, but simple changes wouldn't necessarily make it
"different" and outside their license scope. Just adding to it (for a
different function) wouldn't necessarily do that either. That's assuming
you distribute the whole thing, which you say you're not doing.
Distributing a diff that was automatic (having no content of their original
code) would probably be OK, but it sure sounds risky if code behavior is
important. They could change the source and{*word*222}up the diff by accident.
A user of the diff would have to get their own copy of the company's source
then apply the diff and hope for the best.
If what you are doing is not in conflict with their business mission, you
might consider asking for permission to use the source in a specific way.
Agree to attribution, which is probably what they're looking for anyway, and
it may allow you to distribute a complete solution.
Keep in mind that they're providing the source for a reason. Figure out
what that reason is. If you can help distribution in a way that helps them
with that mission I'd guess they'd be happy to work with you.
Dan
"Nicholas Sherlock" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
Hey all,

A certain company supplies a set of source-code to anyone who registers
for free on their website, but their license only allows you to
redistribute binaries based on their code, and not the source-code itself.
If you made DIFF patches that transformed their original code into your
modified version, and distributed only those, would that be legal?

Cheers,
Nicholas Sherlock
 

Re:Licensing

Nicholas Sherlock wrote:
Quote
It's Atmel, the microcontroller company. The source-code is a
demonstration of their USB-enabled microcontroller,
Yeah, they're being really {*word*7}about that USB source code aren't they.
--
Andy Syms
Technosoft Systems Ltd
 

Re:Licensing

Nicholas Sherlock wrote:
Quote
It's Atmel, the microcontroller company. The source-code is a
demonstration of their USB-enabled microcontroller, it emulates a USB
keyboard and types out the spec for the chip when you press a button
on the circuit board.

The source-code can be downloaded for free, if you register, but
can't be redistributed.

Cheers,
Nicholas Sherlock
It sounds like they're making this available as a reference
implementation. I'm not sure why they don't want their code
distributed (maybe liability?), but it would make sense that they've
published the source code specifically for people to learn from and
create their own implementation.
Have you contacted them to ask?
--
Regards,
Bruce McGee
Glooscap Software