Board index » cppbuilder » Re: Install Kylix3 on Mandrake 10.1, Suse 9.1

Re: Install Kylix3 on Mandrake 10.1, Suse 9.1


2004-11-22 08:14:00 PM
cppbuilder49
Randall Parker < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
Quote
[...]

Lots of obvious solutions get patented. The USPTO simply doesn't have the talent
needed to judge obviousness.
LOL! Someone sent me this link just two
days ago:
appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=%222004023
0959%22.PGNR.&OS=DN/20040230959&RS=DN/20040230959
This supports your statement surprisingly
well. And shows that MS is really doing
this.
(www.theregister.co.uk/2004/11/19/microsoft_wto_winning_without_firing/)
Schobi
--
XXXX@XXXXX.COM is never read
I'm Schobi at suespammers dot org
"The presence of those seeking the truth is infinitely
to be prefered to those thinking they've found it."
Terry Pratchett
 
 

Re:Re: Install Kylix3 on Mandrake 10.1, Suse 9.1

Hendrik Schober < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
Quote
[...]Someone sent me this link just two
days ago:
Damn! OE scrambled it. Here's an easier one:
tinyurl.com/6d4wf
Quote
[...]
Schobi
--
XXXX@XXXXX.COM is never read
I'm Schobi at suespammers dot org
"The presence of those seeking the truth is infinitely
to be prefered to those thinking they've found it."
Terry Pratchett
 

Re:Re: Install Kylix3 on Mandrake 10.1, Suse 9.1

Randall Parker < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:
Quote
Again, I'd like to find someone who has used Emacs and VSE lately who
can offer a real comparison and who is an aggressive user of advanced
features.
I've never used VSE enough to get any real feel for it, but I've heard
a lot of good things from people who use it. It may be a perfectly
capable alternate editor of matching Emacs, and if the extensions are
as easy to make as you say, it sounds like a winner to me.
I'm not an advocate of switching anything for the sake of switching,
except for educational purposes. If you're happy with it, and don't
find yourself ever wondering "I wish I could just make it do this..."
then perhaps it's not worth the effort of switching.
Quote
How big is the Emacs executable image typically? I've got two VSE
instances running at the moment and one is 14 Megs while the other
with many more source files indexed and loaded is 31 Megs.
Emacs actually can be pretty big, especially over time. It allows an
unlimited number of buffers to be opened... and that can grow.
Quote
Also, VSE is good at doing syntax completion when the text is still
incorrect with compiler errors (which BCB is terrible about). How does
Emacs do with code completion with code that is not yet correct?
Emacs doesn't have "code completion", but something far simpler yet
works quite well. Though there are many different implementations,
the stock one is pretty simple: it scans the current buffer for
identifiers and simply completes what you have already typed, by
looking for potential matches. So if a variable name appears in the
code, you can just type the first couple of letters and it'll finish
typing that variable for you by hitting alt-slash (or technically,
"meta"-slash).
There is a "tags" feature that can scan through your project and make
a small database of identifiers, which can also be used to help edit
code, but I admittedly don't make much use of this feature.
Quote
Also, if you turn on color coding can Emacs dynamically update the
colors as you are typing and complete whole tokens that suddenly go
from being a word fragment to, say, a keyword?
Yes. It can even indent your code while you're typing. For example,
while typing the following:
std::cout << "blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah "
Suppose we want to type to the next line "<< x << "blah blah blah";.
Once we begin typing, as soon as we type the << emacs may indent it to
align up immediately under the << on the previous line. Thus it'd
look like this:
std::cout << "blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah "
<< x << "blah blah blah";
That's one example of "electric" typing, when you hit certain keys it
immediately indents, and can invoke a function that is smart enough to
calculate what should happen. It can be made as complicated as you
want, but it's usually just a simple setting to a numerical offset or
to use the return value of a function. Several functions come
out-of-the-box, and writing your own is possible, but something I've
never done.
Anyway, you can notice syntax errors quickly due to the indentation
being messed up and/or the color syntax looking strange.
--
Chris (TeamB);
 

{smallsort}

Re:Re: Install Kylix3 on Mandrake 10.1, Suse 9.1

Randall Parker < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:
Quote
Chris,

If you switch away from Emacs and then back into it and if a file has
been changed external to Emacs then does Emacs notify you and ask if
you want to reload that file?
Yes.
Quote
Also, you talked about text completion as advantageous over code
completion. I can see reasons why that would be the case. But does
Emacs also support code completion?
Not that requires compiler intervention. At least not that I know of,
since it doesn't come with a compiler for C++. But on the other hand,
what emacs does offer works with all languages in all modes.
Quote
Also, do files get individually assigned to an Emacs project or do
directories get assigned with all the files in them?
I just use emacs as an editor for a set of files that I open as used.
I don't really know about how or if it can treat files as a group
forming a project. (It wouldn't surprise me if it could, but it's not
something I do.)
Quote
Also, I saw you talk about the ring delete buffer list. Is there also
a paste buffer list? VSE has a paste buffer list and it shows you the
first line of the last n paste buffers in a pop-up list.
Hmm, I'm not sure. It remembers that stuff, so again it wouldn't
surprise me if someone wrote a function to display it. But that's not
something I have done.
Quote
Also, does Emacs offer a list viewable on the side of all currently
loaded source files?
You can view the list by typing "ctrl-x ctrl-b" and it can split the
window and show you all open buffer. That frame allows you to select
one and it'll switch to it. But it doesn't stay up like the BCB
project manager window.
Quote
Also, can you do search scoped to:
file
directory
directory list
list of files selected from current project list of files
project
workspace (or something that allows subprojects and projects)
Searching in the file is easy. ctrl-s. To search the directory, you
can use grep, which emacs has a really thin wrapper function that
invokes the shell command. For a "directory list", I'm not sure,
since I usually keep such directories in a hierarchy, and just do a
recursive grep over them. In "learning emacs in 24 hours", a book I
got from the discount pile at Waldenbooks and found to my surprise it
to be quite good, it had examples of how to do a search through given
files, using the tags feature. Since I don't use tags, I don't use
that feature. And for "project workspace" I don't know, as I don't
use the project metaphore in emacs, I just edit files.
--
Chris (TeamB);
 

Re:Re: Install Kylix3 on Mandrake 10.1, Suse 9.1

Oscar Fuentes < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
Quote
[...]
>>Emacs generates about 80%
>>of my code on those parts that are the most boring to write, which are
>>also quite error prone.
>
>Interesting. How does this work?

Answering this question and the topic about foreign function
interfaces:

A programming language of mine needs to interface with C++. You
register your C++ stuff by means of a macro that expands to some
template magic. It's similar to this:

LP0_FFI_M("CreateDatem", TIncMngr::CreateDatem, 0x162E9B58);

That's for a method named CreateDatem, that is registered with the
same name. The hex number is used for avoiding collisions on the
internal machinery of the compiler. There are other macros for
functions, constants, global variables, etc. For doing this I created
a few Elisp functions that generates the line for the name where the
cursor is. That means that if I have the cursor on certain buffer and
press a key, the function creates the macro on some other buffer for
the name that is next the cursor. It does some other things required
by the language, as checking that the hex number is unique on the
project.
I see. My IDE would do that, too.
(And no, it wouldn't be harder than it
is in Emacs, as I could just do it once
and have the IDE record it.)
Quote
[...]

>Working with many developers and having seen
>and had to adher to many coding styles, I
>tend to be less obsessed about my own. <g>

You fail to see an obvious advantage of this: when I change works, I
don't need to adapt to the new conventions. I simply change the
specifications of the coding style on Emacs.
I just change my mind. :)
Quote
Furthermore, while
working with multiple projects, some of them coming from different
teams, Emacs can switch the indenting style depending on where the
file is, or some other criteria. So I can say to Emacs: the stuff on
the wx directory uses that style, the files on the lp0 this style, and
so on. Then, I just need to worry about what code I write, not about
how it is positionated.
That seems quite useful.
Quote
[...]

Then, you will not be surprised if I say that there is an
alt.religion.emacs newsgroup [...]
Not at all. :o>
Schobi
--
XXXX@XXXXX.COM is never read
I'm Schobi at suespammers dot org
"The presence of those seeking the truth is infinitely
to be prefered to those thinking they've found it."
Terry Pratchett
 

Re:Re: Install Kylix3 on Mandrake 10.1, Suse 9.1

"Hendrik Schober" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:
Quote
Oscar Fuentes < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
>[...]
>>>Emacs generates about 80%
>>>of my code on those parts that are the most boring to write, which are
>>>also quite error prone.
>>
>>Interesting. How does this work?
>
>Answering this question and the topic about foreign function
>interfaces:
>
>A programming language of mine needs to interface with C++. You
>register your C++ stuff by means of a macro that expands to some
>template magic. It's similar to this:
>
>LP0_FFI_M("CreateDatem", TIncMngr::CreateDatem, 0x162E9B58);
>
[snip]
Quote
I see. My IDE would do that, too.
This is probably correct.
Quote
(And no, it wouldn't be harder than it
is in Emacs, as I could just do it once
and have the IDE record it.)
This is not. You need a program to do the job. Macro recording is not
enough.
[snip]
--
Oscar