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Re: JBuilder 2006: auto generating import statements/getting helpon needed import statements


2006-12-22 11:41:46 PM
jbuilder0
Adding to what Gillmer wrote:
Quote
Since JBuilder 2007 is basically
Eclipse, then maybe I should look at Eclipse instead of learning an
IDE without a future. Sun Java Studio is another free alternative.
"Basically" and "based on" are two vastly different things.
Were JBuilder 2007 "basically Eclipse", there wouldn't be
much value to it. Instead, it is *based on** Eclipse, and adds
significant value on top of it in a JBuilder kind of way.
(Read carefully folks before snapping back: I did not say
"JBuilder-look-and-feel way".)
As for your particular needs, if you don't need the premium
features which JBuilder 2007 offers on top of Eclipse, plain
old Eclipse may suit your needs. It probably won't if you
need to do rapid UI prototyping with a visual tool such as
JBuilder's UI Designer. If you need that, or some of the other
features of JBuilder 2006 which have not been brought into
the *initial* release of JBuilder 2007 (but see the roadmap),
you may want to stick with JBuilder 2006.
(I will continue to use JBuilder 2006 for many of my projects
for a while. Eclipse's WTP puts a serious crimp on my ability
to test Web apps efficiently.)
Gillmer J. Derge [TeamB] wrote:
Quote
Deedee Tee wrote:
>I am having second thoughts about JBuilder because it essentially has
>been abandoned by its developers.

Um, the response you got to your question was from one of the
developers, so he might disagree with you on that.

--
Paul Furbacher (TeamB)
Save time, search the archives:
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That means, do not send email directly to me.
Thank you.
 
 

Re:Re: JBuilder 2006: auto generating import statements/getting helpon needed import statements

On Fri, 22 Dec 2006 10:41:46 -0500, "Paul Furbacher [TeamB]"
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
Quote
Adding to what Gillmer wrote:

>Since JBuilder 2007 is basically
>Eclipse, then maybe I should look at Eclipse instead of learning an
>IDE without a future. Sun Java Studio is another free alternative.

"Basically" and "based on" are two vastly different things.
Were JBuilder 2007 "basically Eclipse", there wouldn't be
much value to it. Instead, it is *based on** Eclipse, and adds
significant value on top of it in a JBuilder kind of way.
(Read carefully folks before snapping back: I did not say
"JBuilder-look-and-feel way".)
I agree. My previous post was not meant to offend anyone, and probably
I should have qualified it better. I am looking for a comfortable and
user-friendly Java IDE, and plan to learn to use it proficiently and
continue using it for years to come. In this context, I am questioning
the usefulness of learning JBuilder 2006. I actually like it, but its
"look and feel" is changed in the 2007 edition. For the moment, a Java
IDE is only a learning tool for me (I am beginning to study for a
SJCP, possibly a later SJCD), and I want to restrict my choices to
free IDEs (hence JBuilder 2007 is out of the picture as long as there
is no free version) and strict J5SE compliance.
There is still a chance that another IDE like Eclipse or Sun Java
Studio will remain sufficiently stable to allow an effortless
transition to future versions. I have used Microsoft Visual Studio for
many years, and it did change from version to version, but mostly in
evolutionary ways. This I am prepared to accept. On the other hand, if
I invest my time in learning JBuilder 2006, I already know at the
outset that I will have to re-learn a different IDE once switching to
an already-existing next version will become obligatory or desirable -
hence my doubts.
 

Re:Re: JBuilder 2006: auto generating import statements/getting helpon needed import statements

Deedee Tee wrote:
Quote
On Fri, 22 Dec 2006 10:41:46 -0500, "Paul Furbacher [TeamB]"
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:

>Adding to what Gillmer wrote:
>
>>Since JBuilder 2007 is basically
>>Eclipse, then maybe I should look at Eclipse instead of learning an
>>IDE without a future. Sun Java Studio is another free alternative.
>"Basically" and "based on" are two vastly different things.
>Were JBuilder 2007 "basically Eclipse", there wouldn't be
>much value to it. Instead, it is *based on** Eclipse, and adds
>significant value on top of it in a JBuilder kind of way.
>(Read carefully folks before snapping back: I did not say
>"JBuilder-look-and-feel way".)

I agree. My previous post was not meant to offend anyone, and probably
I should have qualified it better. I am looking for a comfortable and
user-friendly Java IDE, and plan to learn to use it proficiently and
continue using it for years to come. In this context, I am questioning
the usefulness of learning JBuilder 2006. I actually like it, but its
"look and feel" is changed in the 2007 edition. For the moment, a Java
IDE is only a learning tool for me (I am beginning to study for a
SJCP, possibly a later SJCD), and I want to restrict my choices to
free IDEs (hence JBuilder 2007 is out of the picture as long as there
is no free version) and strict J5SE compliance.

There is still a chance that another IDE like Eclipse or Sun Java
Studio will remain sufficiently stable to allow an effortless
transition to future versions. I have used Microsoft Visual Studio for
many years, and it did change from version to version, but mostly in
evolutionary ways. This I am prepared to accept. On the other hand, if
I invest my time in learning JBuilder 2006, I already know at the
outset that I will have to re-learn a different IDE once switching to
an already-existing next version will become obligatory or desirable -
hence my doubts.
I think I would have to agree with you. JBuilder 2006 is a great
product, but it is the end of the road for "PrimeTime" which is the base
on which the IDE was built.
For the purposes of starting to learn a new IDE right now, given the
caveat that it be free, I would go with Eclipse. After you start to use
Eclipse, I think you will come to see the value that JBuilder 2007
offers, so when you are in a position to purchase an IDE, it will be a
natural fit.
JBuilder 2007 has many new features and integrations that are not
available in any other product, including JBuilder 2006. After you have
used Eclipse for a while, check out these videos of JBuilder 2007 in action.
dn.codegear.com/article/33880
--
Regards,
Lori Olson [TeamB]
------------
Save yourself, and everyone else, some time and search the
newsgroups and the FAQ-O-Matic before posting your next
question.
Google Advanced Newsgroup Search
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{smallsort}

Re:Re: JBuilder 2006: auto generating import statements/getting helpon needed import statements

On Fri, 22 Dec 2006 10:27:52 -0700, "Lori M Olson [TeamB]"
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
I have been evaluating Eclipse for a few days, and it seems it will
satisfy almost all my needs. It certainly is much more comfortable,
feature-rich and user-friendly than Sun Java Studio. The only weak
point of Eclipse I found so far is the built-in GUI designer, but
there are non-commercial licenses to products like Instantiations'
WindowDesigner Pro that are affordable. Switching to Eclipse now also
leaves a door open for possibly switching back to JBuilder if/when a
free or affordable version of JBuilder 2007 will become available.
[..]
Quote
I think I would have to agree with you. JBuilder 2006 is a great
product, but it is the end of the road for "PrimeTime" which is the base
on which the IDE was built.

For the purposes of starting to learn a new IDE right now, given the
caveat that it be free, I would go with Eclipse. After you start to use
Eclipse, I think you will come to see the value that JBuilder 2007
offers, so when you are in a position to purchase an IDE, it will be a
natural fit.

JBuilder 2007 has many new features and integrations that are not
available in any other product, including JBuilder 2006. After you have
used Eclipse for a while, check out these videos of JBuilder 2007 in action.

dn.codegear.com/article/33880