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Re: Core Java Vol1


2003-09-02 11:41:12 PM
jbuilder6
Zap wrote:
Quote
I'm about half way through Core Java Vol1 - If you have some previous
exposure to C++ or VB then its great. Its written very clearly and they know
when the abstraction level is creeping up -they go to great pains to explain
and reiterate rather than avoid the issues. I don't know what vol2 is like
but i am expecting a repeat performance of vol 1.


It would probably be a nightmare for a newbie programmer, but IMHO for
the experienced programmer, the Core Java set is the best way to learn
Java.
--
Regards,
Lori Olson (TeamB)
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Re:Re: Core Java Vol1

On Tue, 02 Sep 2003 09:41:12 -0600, "Lori M Olson (TeamB)"
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
Quote
It would probably be a nightmare for a newbie programmer, but IMHO for
the experienced programmer, the Core Java set is the best way to learn
Java.
I have mixed feelings about the Core Java series. For example, their
Swing examples always show creating a new form as "new Form()" and
then doing a Form.add() against the new form instance to add objects
to it. This is a joke - no one does it this way. We all inherit from
the Form class and then add objects that we need in the contructor (or
in JBInit so that the designer sees the changes).
Other than that, Core Java isn't too bad.
Save yourself some time and check these sites:
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Joi Ellis's Faq-O-Matic:
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Re:Re: Core Java Vol1

"David Orriss, Jr." wrote:
Quote
I have mixed feelings about the Core Java series. For example, their
Swing examples always show creating a new form as "new Form()" and
then doing a Form.add() against the new form instance to add objects
to it. This is a joke - no one does it this way. We all inherit from
the Form class and then add objects that we need in the contructor (or
in JBInit so that the designer sees the changes).
Other than that, Core Java isn't too bad.
OK, jumping into someone else's thread...
So far I only have one Java book, "Effective Java" by Joshua Bloch. My
only other reference is the Sun JDK!
I am sold on the value of a good book (and I consider Effective Java to
be a good example) and likewise concerned about how dangerous/expensive
a bad book can be. Experience in the C++ market is that there a lot
more bad books than good books out there, but the good ones give
exceptional value.
Is there a standard shopping list of recommended Java books?
What other titles would you recommend for someone who knows software
design quite well, including OO (whatever that means <g>) and patterns,
but still has little experience with Java.
[My background is mainly C++ these days, but six years of Object Pascal
and Delphi somewhere in the past]
--
AlisdairM
Team Thai Kingdom
 

{smallsort}

Re:Re: Core Java Vol1

"Alisdair Meredith" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
Is there a standard shopping list of recommended Java books?
What other titles would you recommend for someone who knows software
design quite well, including OO (whatever that means <g>) and patterns,
but still has little experience with Java.
Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in Java" is very good, and available for free
from his website, useful if you're not a bathroom reader, or
don't mind taking your laptop into the john.;)
www.mindview.net/books
Mike
 

Re:Re: Core Java Vol1

On 9/3/2003 at 2:34:20 PM, Mike Mormando wrote:
Quote
Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in Java" is very good, and available for
free from his website, useful if you're not a bathroom reader, or
don't mind taking your laptop into the john.;)
Of course, if you *are* a bathroom reader, you can always order the
print edition:
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0131002872
--
Regards,
John McGrath [TeamB]
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Re:Re: Core Java Vol1

On Wed, 03 Sep 2003 16:21:26 +0100, Alisdair Meredith
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
Quote
Is there a standard shopping list of recommended Java books?
What other titles would you recommend for someone who knows software
design quite well, including OO (whatever that means <g>) and patterns,
but still has little experience with Java.
If I was starting *right now* to learn Java I'd get the following:
- Thinking in Java
- Java in a Nutshell
- Java Foundation Classes in a Nutshell
- Java Examples in a Nutshell.
And then optionally I'd consider Herb Schildt's "Java 2 The Complete
Reference".
Other than that, nothing else jumps to mind as being particularly
memorable... and I have a *lot* of Java books... ;)
Save yourself some time and check these sites:
Borland Newsgroup Search:
www.borland.com/newsgroups/ngsearch.html
Joi Ellis's Faq-O-Matic:
www.visi.com/~gyles19/fom-serve/cache/1.html