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C++ Builder to JBuilder


2003-08-11 12:54:49 AM
jbuilder19
Hi everyone,
I am in the middle of taking a huge step by converting all of our Borland
C++ Builder applications to JBuilder Applications and Servlets. Has anyone
made this jump before? If so, can you tell me more about the transition?
Is it a wise move? What problems that I may incur?
Thanks in advance
 
 

Re:C++ Builder to JBuilder

betch wrote:
Quote
Hi everyone,

I am in the middle of taking a huge step by converting all of our Borland
C++ Builder applications to JBuilder Applications and Servlets. Has
anyone
made this jump before? If so, can you tell me more about the transition?
Is it a wise move? What problems that I may incur?

Thanks in advance
Moving from BCB to Java or JBuilder will, of course, not provide you with
any wizards to do so. If your BCB applications are server side type apps
(aka Servlets, ASP to JSP), performance should be rather close on any
modern hardware. The JSP pages in fact will actually be faster than the
ASP-ISAPI pages due to the fact that JSP pages are compiled as servlets.
Modern classloaders are also very quick as is JDBC.
As far as Java applications (aka Swing/AWT), you will notice a performance
degradation between BCB compiled applications and Java ones. How great that
performance difference is will depend upon your users hardware. The
performance hit can be only a small to moderate decrease in performance to
a much greater performance difference on older or antiquated hardware. Java
GUIs need CPU cycles and RAM to run efficiently.
If you target platforms are PIII class processors and above, with 256 meg of
Ram, performance should be more than acceptable and in some cases (using
1.4.2), you may not notice any appreciable performance degradation at all
(of course it would depend upon the application). On PIs or older PIIs with
less than 96 meg, I would not attempt it (GUI wise, that is). They will
run, but performance will not be very good.
Since the entry level hardware of today that is currently being sold is a 1
gz. processor with at least 128 meg of RAM, I would not be too concerned
for any new users as far as performance goes. But if your software has to
support older or antiquated hardware, that could be a concern. There are
tricks here you can use as well to speed up operations, but it will require
some lengthly study to find these performance enhancements in coding
practices.
We currently write Java Web Applications and GUIs as well. Since we set the
requirements in our software guides (as do most commercial companies), we
have not had any problems with the Swing GUIs we distribute. Nearly all
companies today are using PIIIs or better, so it is of no real concern or
consequence using Java Swing Applications. But if you are targeting
audenices with older hardware, I would definitely plan to test before
undertaking a lot of effort on your part(s).
Basically if their hardware adequately runs on Mac OS X or Windows 2000 or
XP, or meets the requirements for these OSes, then Swing GUIs should
perform well.
Hope this helps ya!!
 

Re:C++ Builder to JBuilder

Paul,
Could I get you to email me on my XXXX@XXXXX.COM account so I can ask
you a few more questions?
Thanks
"pnichols" <paul@ comp.net>wrote in message
Quote
betch wrote:

>Hi everyone,
>
>I am in the middle of taking a huge step by converting all of our
Borland
>C++ Builder applications to JBuilder Applications and Servlets. Has
>anyone
>made this jump before? If so, can you tell me more about the
transition?
>Is it a wise move? What problems that I may incur?
>
>Thanks in advance

Moving from BCB to Java or JBuilder will, of course, not provide you with
any wizards to do so. If your BCB applications are server side type apps
(aka Servlets, ASP to JSP), performance should be rather close on any
modern hardware. The JSP pages in fact will actually be faster than the
ASP-ISAPI pages due to the fact that JSP pages are compiled as servlets.
Modern classloaders are also very quick as is JDBC.

As far as Java applications (aka Swing/AWT), you will notice a performance
degradation between BCB compiled applications and Java ones. How great
that
performance difference is will depend upon your users hardware. The
performance hit can be only a small to moderate decrease in performance to
a much greater performance difference on older or antiquated hardware.
Java
GUIs need CPU cycles and RAM to run efficiently.

If you target platforms are PIII class processors and above, with 256 meg
of
Ram, performance should be more than acceptable and in some cases (using
1.4.2), you may not notice any appreciable performance degradation at all
(of course it would depend upon the application). On PIs or older PIIs
with
less than 96 meg, I would not attempt it (GUI wise, that is). They will
run, but performance will not be very good.

Since the entry level hardware of today that is currently being sold is a
1
gz. processor with at least 128 meg of RAM, I would not be too concerned
for any new users as far as performance goes. But if your software has to
support older or antiquated hardware, that could be a concern. There are
tricks here you can use as well to speed up operations, but it will
require
some lengthly study to find these performance enhancements in coding
practices.

We currently write Java Web Applications and GUIs as well. Since we set
the
requirements in our software guides (as do most commercial companies), we
have not had any problems with the Swing GUIs we distribute. Nearly all
companies today are using PIIIs or better, so it is of no real concern or
consequence using Java Swing Applications. But if you are targeting
audenices with older hardware, I would definitely plan to test before
undertaking a lot of effort on your part(s).

Basically if their hardware adequately runs on Mac OS X or Windows 2000 or
XP, or meets the requirements for these OSes, then Swing GUIs should
perform well.

Hope this helps ya!!



 

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