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Questions about converting a desktop database app to a Java applet


2003-07-11 03:35:26 PM
jbuilder7
I need to replicate the basic functionality of a desktop database application
online.
Said basic functionality consists of searching about 3 million records and
displaying images based on the search results.
In addition to displaying the images, and allowing for basic viewing
manipulation, it's also necessary to have interactive annotations.
I have not programmed in Java before (I wrote the application to be
duplicated in C++ Builder), so I'd like to know what the major issues and
obstacles there are to such a conversion.
Overall, what I'm trying to achieve is the equivalent of simply modifying the
existing application to search data remotely instead of locally (and using a
server-side cursor, since fetching all results immediately would be
counterproductive), and retrieve images as needed. This while not requiring
the user to download anything before hand (except perhaps a Java runtime).
In other words, the users go to the web site, the required components
downloaded, and they're ready to go.
How realistic is this?
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Re:Questions about converting a desktop database app to a Java applet

Mike:
Not very realistic for an Applet. Why not a thin Java client delivered
with JWS instead? At least that way you'll be able to connect to your
database server without dealing with the Applet security sandbox
basically telling you "no way in hell".
If you do it as an Applet you'll have to force the user to download the
Java plugin and that is no more or less onerous than using JWS plus it
will let you pretty much do a straight port.
-Rich
Mike Ruskai wrote:
Quote
I need to replicate the basic functionality of a desktop database application
online.

Said basic functionality consists of searching about 3 million records and
displaying images based on the search results.

In addition to displaying the images, and allowing for basic viewing
manipulation, it's also necessary to have interactive annotations.

I have not programmed in Java before (I wrote the application to be
duplicated in C++ Builder), so I'd like to know what the major issues and
obstacles there are to such a conversion.

Overall, what I'm trying to achieve is the equivalent of simply modifying the
existing application to search data remotely instead of locally (and using a
server-side cursor, since fetching all results immediately would be
counterproductive), and retrieve images as needed. This while not requiring
the user to download anything before hand (except perhaps a Java runtime).
In other words, the users go to the web site, the required components
downloaded, and they're ready to go.

How realistic is this?


--
- Mike

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Re:Questions about converting a desktop database app to a Java applet

On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 19:23:21 -0700, Rich Wilkman wrote:
Quote
Mike:

Not very realistic for an Applet. Why not a thin Java client delivered
with JWS instead? At least that way you'll be able to connect to your
database server without dealing with the Applet security sandbox
basically telling you "no way in hell".

If you do it as an Applet you'll have to force the user to download the
Java plugin and that is no more or less onerous than using JWS plus it
will let you pretty much do a straight port.
OK, so what's JWS?
Remove 'spambegone.net' and reverse to send e-mail.
 

{smallsort}

Re:Questions about converting a desktop database app to a Java applet

Rich Wilkman wrote:
Quote
JWS is Java Web Start. Very similar to a technology Borland had a few
years back but never really followed up on. Basically JWS lets you have
a web page "front" that downloads and sets up a client with jre for the
user. If you want the flexibility of a Swing UI, that's probably your
best bet.

I totally concur with Rich here, BYW, and for what it is worth <G>.
Either this or a full fledged Java aplication.