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GUI programming


2004-05-17 02:19:43 AM
jbuilder0
Hi,
I am new to Java and JBuilder. I am used to Microsoft products, and would
like to know if JBuilder offers the possibility to "see" the various layouts
through some kind of lines that, for example, show where the rows and
columns are (if I choose GridLayout). It all seems so complicated to design
a GUI, but I am sure that must be a way of doing this properly. Any resource
I could read to avoid spending hours just to place my GUI components on a
window?
Thanks
Mike
 
 

Re:GUI programming

On 5/16/2004 at 2:19:43 PM, Mike wrote:
Quote
I am new to Java and JBuilder. I am used to Microsoft products, and would
like to know if JBuilder offers the possibility to "see" the various
layouts through some kind of lines that, for example, show where the
rows and columns are (if I choose GridLayout). It all seems so
complicated to design a GUI, but I am sure that must be a way of doing
this properly. Any resource I could read to avoid spending hours just to
place my GUI components on a window?
Have you looked at the UI Designer? If not, view a UI class and select
the "Design" tab at the bottom of the content pane. This is where you
normally see the source code.
--
Regards,
John McGrath [TeamB]
---------------------------------------------------
Before sending me e-mail, please read:
www.JPMcGrath.net/newsgroups/e-mail.html
 

Re:GUI programming

Quote
I am new to Java and JBuilder. I am used to Microsoft products, and would
Yup, been there. JB is very different that Visual Studio. At first, I
thought it was JB, but after learning more about java, it turns out, it's
Java that's so different than VB or Access or WordBasic, or Excel coding.
In VB, I was used to what Java calls either Null layout or XYLayout layout.
In VB, you also have to be worried about form resizing, but you don't have
to worry about that so much in Java. It's a compromise, for the benefits of
dynamically resizing forms, you have to learn about layouts. Trade offs.
Quote
columns are (if I choose GridLayout). It all seems so complicated to
design
I believe the UI Designer does that for you.
Good luck.
 

{smallsort}

Re:GUI programming

Hi Mike,
There is no "Grid" option on the designer. I know
what you mean, Symantec's VisualCafe used to show
a grid in it's designer window and allow one to
snap to grid. It was real handy for static layouts.
There is a pro-layout manager culture in the [TeamB]
folks so you probably won't get much sympathy there :-)
I personally think that layout managers suck... :-)
Mike wrote:
Quote
Hi,

I am new to Java and JBuilder. I am used to Microsoft products, and would
like to know if JBuilder offers the possibility to "see" the various layouts
through some kind of lines that, for example, show where the rows and
columns are (if I choose GridLayout). It all seems so complicated to design
a GUI, but I am sure that must be a way of doing this properly. Any resource
I could read to avoid spending hours just to place my GUI components on a
window?

Thanks
Mike


 

Re:GUI programming

Ken Warner < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:
Quote
There is a pro-layout manager culture in the [TeamB]
folks so you probably won't get much sympathy there :-)
Actually it's not limited to TeamB - the pro-layout culture is present
in all of the Java community, especially among those who have been
frustrated by native apps that ignored the possibility the user had
different font settings than the developer. :)
 

Re:GUI programming

I guess I'm not in the Java Community then...
What I do is to trap the Resize event and then
put my components where I want them. It's easier
to write a little event handler -- usually much
smaller than jbinit() -- and it's a lot faster
than trying to tease a stack of JPanels and layout
managers to do what I want. And I makes a smaller
app/applet to deploy since you don't have all the
extra code making layout managers and panels...
But then I've always been different :-)
Tor Iver Wilhelmsen (TeamB) wrote:
Quote
Ken Warner < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >writes:


>There is a pro-layout manager culture in the [TeamB]
>folks so you probably won't get much sympathy there :-)


Actually it's not limited to TeamB - the pro-layout culture is present
in all of the Java community, especially among those who have been
frustrated by native apps that ignored the possibility the user had
different font settings than the developer. :)
 

Re:GUI programming

Ken Warner wrote:
Quote
What I do is to trap the Resize event and then
put my components where I want them.
That's what layout managers do. Sounds like you're reinventing the wheel.
--
Gillmer J. Derge (TeamB)
 

Re:GUI programming

Perhaps, but the way I do it is a lot
simpler with less overhead and much
more direct than trying to coerce one
or more layout managers into doing what
I want instead of settling for what they
want to do.
I mean, who knows better where I want
a component -- me or some third world
programmer with malaria?
Gillmer J. Derge (TeamB) wrote:
Quote
Ken Warner wrote:

>What I do is to trap the Resize event and then
>put my components where I want them.


That's what layout managers do. Sounds like you're reinventing the wheel.