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personal versus enterprise for client/server


2003-12-17 10:41:10 PM
jbuilder16
Hello.
Let's say I need to write client-server database application.
I have covered all other aspects with open-source software,
so freeware or commercial tool is not an issue, but it would be
dot on "i" if I actually manage to pull this thing with freeware
tools also.
As I understand, I don't need J2EE to write 2-tier app, I can do it
with J2SE + Eclipse.
(I would need J2EE if I wanted app to be "served" :) )
Or better, with JBuilder Personal, because it has GUI designer.
My question is, what would I loose by not using JBuilder Enterprise?
Thanks
 
 

Re:personal versus enterprise for client/server

Buch wrote:
Quote
Let's say I need to write client-server database application.
I have covered all other aspects with open-source software,
so freeware or commercial tool is not an issue, but it would be
dot on "i" if I actually manage to pull this thing with freeware
tools also.
As I understand, I don't need J2EE to write 2-tier app, I can do it
with J2SE + Eclipse.
(I would need J2EE if I wanted app to be "served" :) )

Or better, with JBuilder Personal, because it has GUI designer.

My question is, what would I loose by not using JBuilder Enterprise?
First, a Features Matrix is available at
www.borland.com/jbuilder. It spells out
quite clearly the differences between Foundation,
Developer, and Enterprise.
Second, what you describe as your target kind of
application, JBuilder X Developer may be the
edition for you. JBuilder X Foundation is
pleasingly full of features which you previously
had to pay for, so take a serious look at it first.
Download it and put it through its paces. If you
think you can do it with Eclipse and your bag
of open source solutions, you should just as
easily do it with JBuilder X Foundation. Eclipse
doesn't have a GUI designer, and I can attest that
the GridBag Layout Assistant in JBuilder is worth
its weight in gold. (And if you ask me how much
it weighs, I'll guess about a ton, metric or
otherwise.)
Third, there's this canard that one cannot do J2EE
development without JBuilder Enterprise, so you had
better use Eclipse. J2EE is just Java, plain and
simple ... well, I'll take back both the plain and
simple. It's just Java, with a lot of complexity
and nit-picky configurations and so on. But let
me stress: it's just Java!
If you have to develop J2EE applications,
get yourself the J2EE SDK, a simple editor, open
a command-line utility, write your Ant scripts,
and start developing.
Is this approach going to be the most productive?
Some hairy chested males will maintain (quite
erroneously) that it is.
JBuilder Enterprise adds value to your development
experience. It makes you more productive because
it integrates the development, debugging and
deployment processes into the IDE. It makes
you more productive because it provides assistance
(code insight, wizards, etc.) in doing the tedious,
thoughtless tasks which are better handled by
a computer than you brain. Your brain is supposed
to be doing the difficult, not the repetitive, work.
A good IDE frees your brain to do the important
work.
You can do J2EE development with JBuilder X Foundation:
write your Ant scripts to init, compile, deploy, and
start your J2EE server (e.g., JBoss). Really straight
forward, actually. If you have to write EJBs, use
XDoclet, and do all the compiling from your Ant script.
Run the Ant scripts from within the JBuilder environment.
(Rhetorical question: Do you really need the wizards?)
Eclipse? It's free. So is JBuilder X Foundation.
Eclipse has plug-ins. So does JBuilder; they're
called Open Tools. You can write them yourself
if you don't find one at Code Central that fits
your needs.
Get the feature matrix for JBuilder X. Scan
down the Foundation column and compare the
available features to those of Eclipse.
If you are familiar with JBuilder and find that
you are comfortable using it, then get Foundation.
If you find that Developer fits both your needs
and your budget, go for it.
But, if you like Eclipse (I don't), it fits
your needs, and you have evaluated Foundation
but don't like it, go with Eclipse.
--
Paul Furbacher (TeamB)
Save time, search the archives:
www.borland.com/newsgroups/ngsearch.html
Is it in Joi Ellis's Faq-O-Matic?
www.visi.com/~gyles19/fom-serve/cache/1.html
Finally, please send responses to the newsgroup only.
That means, do not send email directly to me.
Thank you.