Board index » kylix » Attention: pnichols

Attention: pnichols


2004-05-08 01:22:18 AM
kylix0
Hi Paul,
I sent the message below in the middle of a large thread. I was hoping
you had some pointers for me. Any ideas?
Thanks
Dean
Dean Hill wrote:
Quote
Hi,

I have to say that this was a very interesting post. I have been
programming for too long and wanted to get into Java. Can already
program in Delphi, C++, VB (Aarrgh, should not have admitted that),
VB.NET and C#. Delphi is my true love back from the Turbo Pascal 3.0
days. I see more of a future in Java for multi-platform use and the
way I see it, it is always good to keep ones options open. I have
Eclipse (Configured for C++ use).

What would be a good starting point / tutorial for Java. Apart from
the syntactical differences which should be quite easy to adopt. The
biggest unknown is the class libraries etc. Also, how should I setup
an IDE. I would like to stay with Eclipse for now although I would
like a visual forms designer (is their something open source / free as
a starting point that includes J2EE)?

Thanks

Dean

pnichols wrote:

>But there are other Layout Managers that work much better now. Some
>are open source, some are proprietary, and some are part of the
>J2SDK 1.4.x. Spring is not bad, and the TableLayout is pretty good,
>which is in the JGoodies OS tools.

>Plus lots of good stuff.
 
 

Re:Attention: pnichols

Dean Hill wrote:
Quote
Hi Paul,

I sent the message below in the middle of a large thread. I was hoping
you had some pointers for me. Any ideas?

Thanks

Dean

Dean Hill wrote:

>Hi,
>
>I have to say that this was a very interesting post. I have been
>programming for too long and wanted to get into Java. Can already
>program in Delphi, C++, VB (Aarrgh, should not have admitted that),
>VB.NET and C#. Delphi is my true love back from the Turbo Pascal 3.0
>days. I see more of a future in Java for multi-platform use and the
>way I see it, it is always good to keep ones options open. I have
>Eclipse (Configured for C++ use).
>
Personally I do not like Eclipse for Java work, but that's me. I prefer Net
Beans to Eclipse, but JBuilder is my favorite.
Eclipse does a good job for J2EE development, provided you purchase some of
the plugins available. Some are free (JBoss now uses the Eclipse
interface), but the better GUI Builders will cost you (although they are
reasonably priced).
Quote
>What would be a good starting point / tutorial for Java. Apart from
>the syntactical differences which should be quite easy to adopt. The
>biggest unknown is the class libraries etc. Also, how should I setup
>an IDE. I would like to stay with Eclipse for now although I would
>like a visual forms designer (is their something open source / free as
>a starting point that includes J2EE)?
As far as tutorials, you can check our free JavaForDelphiprogrammers site
(www.computer-logic.net/javadelphi). It is somwhat limited and is
now out of date. I hope to get started back on it soon.
The best overall Java books are produced by Deitel and Deitel, IMHO. I use
their materials when we teach. Once you get the basics down, look at the
KickStart series and some of the OReilly books. "Thinking in Java" by Bruce
Eckel is free, but it too is somewhat out of date (or was last time I
looked). You can get it from www.bruceeckel.com/Books/TIJ
As previously stated, overall, I like JBuilder the best. The free Foundation
copy should serve you well for RAD Swing GUI, but has no J2EE tools. For
overall freeware, NetBeans is more complete than JBuilder Foundation
(includes development for J2EE Servlets/JSPs). EJB support is weak in Net
Beans, although the Sun One version is fairly complete. Both NetBeans and
Sun One supports C++ as well.
For Java Server Faces, check out the new Sun Java Creator Studio. It is in
beta, but looks quite promising.
Quote
>
>Thanks
>
>Dean
Anytime.
 

Re:Attention: pnichols

Hi Paul,
Thanks for the help.
pnichols wrote:
Quote
Personally I do not like Eclipse for Java work, but that's me. I
prefer Net Beans to Eclipse, but JBuilder is my favorite.
I have downloaded NetBeans and JBuilder X and will give them a try.
The last version of JBuilder I bought was 3 so I am sure it has
improved.
Quote
As far as tutorials, you can check our free JavaForDelphiprogrammers
site (www.computer-logic.net/javadelphi). It is somwhat
limited and is now out of date. I hope to get started back on it soon.
Could not get into the site. Got the Go button and then nothing for 45
minutes. Will try again later.
Quote
As previously stated, overall, I like JBuilder the best. The free
Foundation copy should serve you well for RAD Swing GUI, but has no
J2EE tools. For overall freeware, NetBeans is more complete than
JBuilder Foundation (includes development for J2EE Servlets/JSPs).
EJB support is weak in Net Beans, although the Sun One version is
fairly complete. Both NetBeans and Sun One supports C++ as well.
I suppose if you pay peanuts, you get monkeys. A good IDE is going to
cost something. I will test the ones the two and see how things get
along.
Thanks again for all the help.
Dean
 

{smallsort}

Re:Attention: pnichols

Dean Hill wrote:
Quote
Hi Paul,

Thanks for the help.

pnichols wrote:


Could not get into the site. Got the Go button and then nothing for 45
minutes. Will try again later.

Sorry. My Server provider changed the Web Site address (URI, not URL) and I
did not realize when he restarted the server that the Database was not
restarted. Works fine now.
Quote

I suppose if you pay peanuts, you get monkeys. A good IDE is going to
cost something. I will test the ones the two and see how things get
along.

True. If you are testing, look at JB Pro or Enterprise. Pro will work well
as long as you do not need rapid EJB and testing environment.
Quote
Thanks again for all the help.

anytime.