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Re: Cross Platform Development


2005-08-02 06:41:03 PM
kylix0
On 2005-07-29, Dmitry < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote:
Quote
If you have a 750BMW and the BMW factory is down and your gear-box is down
too, you
in theory can to produce spares by file but it is not possible as you
understand :))
So if your project is based on FPC and FPC is die, you project die too.
This is false.
While I agree that if FPC would die, it would be very hard (and quite
unlikely) if a mere user would continue development on the same scale, this doesn't
mean that having the source is a very big thing.
Small fixes to compiler and runtime, and maybe even a small OS port are doable. (e.g.
porting to another *nix is typically a week full time to get the initial core working).
This can matter really a lot to businesses, since it gives application
developers some more breathing room, and allows to directly attack the problem on the place
where it is instead of performing complex workarounds (like binary postprocessors).
Specially on ever changing Linux, this can be quite important, as Kylix
history quite effectively shows.
 
 

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

Dmitry wrote:
Quote
If you have a 750BMW and the BMW factory is down and your gear-box is down
too, you
in theory can to produce spares by file but it is not possible as you
understand :))
So if your project is based on FPC and FPC is die, you project die too.
This is true for every software, just remember that software of some company I
think it was called Kylix ;)? Commercial projects die easily, OSS projects are
much harder to kill, just look at the Mozilla case. And even better, if an OSS
project is really important for you (no, I'am not talking about some shareware
programmer making some thousand Euros per year but software making more money)
you can continue to develop it yourself or at least fixing it.
 

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

Quote
That is why the StringBuilder class was introduced
(by MS, not Borland) to give you speed when manipulating strings under .NET.

That is what I don't understand. If with all operations the
Stringbuilder is faster than the ".NET string class" why did then not
just improve the ".NET string class" using the Stringbuilder code ?
I was told it that way:
If you do:
s1 := s1 + s2;
This is fast with the .NET string class, as there will be no memory
reallocation. The old s1 version just sits around there untouched until
the garbage control needs memory and frees it (in most cases this never
happens until the application is closed.
If you do the same with Stringbuilder it's slower because Stringbuilder
is a fare more complex thing than the .NET string class.
But if you do
s1[1] = 'X';
Stringbuilder has a function do do this in a single .NET API call.
Using the .NET string class would mean the compiler has to do something like
s1 := copy(s1, 2, high(Integer));
sx := 'X';
s1 := sx + s1;
Of course this is much slower than using Stringbuilder.
-Michael
 

{smallsort}

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

Michael Schnell wrote:
Quote
>That is why the StringBuilder class was introduced
>(by MS, not Borland) to give you speed when manipulating strings
>under .NET.

That is what I don't understand. If with all operations the
Stringbuilder is faster than the ".NET string class" why did then not
just improve the ".NET string class" using the Stringbuilder code ?
You will have to ask Microsoft that.
--
Robert Love
Blog: peakxml.com
 

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

"Ender" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
"Robby Tanner" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >
>Either one, I guess. I'm a Delphi programmer pre{*word*109}ly, but if
>cross-platform means getting in to C++, I'll head that direction.
>
>C++ has a lot of things to offer so it wouldn't be such a bad thing to
>get in to.

I recommend C++ for cross-platform development. I'm switched on the C++
after Kylix failure. C++/STL/BOOST for console program development. Add
here Qt for GUI, and OCL for Oracle connectivity.
STL is the Standard Template Library?
Rob
 

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

"Robby Tanner" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote

"Ender" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
news: XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...
>"Robby Tanner" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >
>>Either one, I guess. I'm a Delphi programmer pre{*word*109}ly, but if
>>cross-platform means getting in to C++, I'll head that direction.
>>
>>C++ has a lot of things to offer so it wouldn't be such a bad thing to
>>get in to.
>
>I recommend C++ for cross-platform development. I'm switched on the C++
>after Kylix failure. C++/STL/BOOST for console program development. Add
>here Qt for GUI, and OCL for Oracle connectivity.

STL is the Standard Template Library?
If so, where do I get it?
I downloaded boost, thanks for the pointer.
Rob
 

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

Quote
>I recommend C++ for cross-platform development. I'm switched on the C++
>after Kylix failure. C++/STL/BOOST for console program development. Add
>here Qt for GUI, and OCL for Oracle connectivity.
"Robby Tanner" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >
STL is the Standard Template Library?
Yes.
 

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

"Robby Tanner" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >
Quote
>STL is the Standard Template Library?

If so, where do I get it?

I downloaded boost, thanks for the pointer.
STL usually included in the modern Linux distros, i can't tell you right now
what package it uses.
 

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

"Ender" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
"Robby Tanner" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >
>>STL is the Standard Template Library?
>
>If so, where do I get it?
>
>I downloaded boost, thanks for the pointer.

STL usually included in the modern Linux distros, i can't tell you right
now what package it uses.
There's no windows version or is it version-independent? How about BOOST?
I'm not stuck being windows-only, just curious about portability.
Rob
 

Re:Re: Cross Platform Development

"Robby Tanner" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >
Quote
There's no windows version or is it version-independent? How about BOOST?
I'm not stuck being windows-only, just curious about portability.
Both STL and BOOST are cross-platform. As i know MSVC shipped with their own
version of STL, however STL-dependent code you write will compile on Linux
without problems. BOOST from www.boost.org will compile on both,
Linux and Windows.
Recently i wrote an Windows console application which use only pure C++, STL
and BOOST. Then it was compiled on the Linux without code changes. The
changes was done only in build scripts.