Board index » kylix » Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop


2003-12-15 04:57:55 AM
kylix0
Ender wrote:
Quote
Mike Mormando:
"ISTR verbage saying that if illegally obtained IP, (mp3 files, movies,
ebooks, etc) was detected M$ reserved the right to disable them."

IMHO, having right to do something without actual possibility - stupid air
shake.
I would think that it's implicit that in order to disable something it must
reside on modifiable media.
--
.. P.
 
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

"Ender" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
>>I'm curious how they can disable DivX movie written on the CD? Or
>>illegally obtained mp3 files also located on read-only media?

P>who said that they could?

Mike Mormando:
"ISTR verbage saying that if illegally obtained IP, (mp3 files, movies,
ebooks, etc) was detected M$ reserved the right to disable them."

IMHO, having right to do something without actual possibility - stupid air
shake.
Well, remembering back to some earlier EULA controversies with Borland, at
one point Borland's EULA stated they could come and physically inspect all
of your machines to make sure you had the right number of licenses, so
stupidity and EULA's do seem to go hand in hand.
And "disabling" media wouldn't necessarily mean altering the content, though
if it were on an HD they could.
What about just making M$ media player ignore the suspect content.
What about forcing ALL media players to ignore suspect content.
Might be possible with Longhorn and new filesystem?
Who knows??
Mike
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

MM>Well, remembering back to some earlier EULA controversies with
MM>Borland, at one point Borland's EULA stated they could come and
MM>physically inspect all of your machines to make sure you had the
MM>right number of licenses, so stupidity and EULA's do seem to go hand
MM>in hand.
Yes, i'm remember this.
MM>And "disabling" media wouldn't necessarily mean altering the
MM>content, though if it were on an HD they could.
MM>What about just making M$ media player ignore the suspect content.
MM>What about forcing ALL media players to ignore suspect content.
MM>Might be possible with Longhorn and new filesystem?
MM>Who knows??
I think determination of what content is illegal is very fuzzy process. What
if software component that determine legality of content just have error and
mistakenly decide that actually legal content is illegal? What if someone's
software create content that look as illegal? So MS quickly drown in the
ocean of support calls or something like this. The end will be one of two
cases:
1. Step by step instructions how to disable that software component from
Microsoft.
2. Classis hack of this component as this was happened with Windows
Activation. I know people who legally bought Windows XP but cracked
activation mechanism just because it's faster than reactivate Windows.
---
Andrew V. Fionik, Papillon Systems, Unix Programmers Group
For reply use "ender" instead of "fionika" in e-mail.
 

{smallsort}

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

I predicted the exact same thing in this newsgroup not too long ago. Looks
like I'm not the only one with the same belief:
slashdot.org/article.pl
Everyone else on the planet is promoting Linux while the focus here is on
.Net...
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

Jeff Undercash" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message news: XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...
Quote
I predicted the exact same thing in this newsgroup not too long ago. Looks
like I'm not the only one with the same belief:
slashdot.org/article.pl

Everyone else on the planet is promoting Linux while the focus here is on
.Net...
When you go into an electronics or computer retailer, do you
see Linux PCs? I don't even see them at Walmart, and Walmart
sells $199 Lindows PCs. Aside from slashdot pontificaters, what's
the evidence?
--
Hilton Evans
-----------------------------------------------
ChemPen Chemical Structure Software
www.chempensoftware.com
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.561 / Virus Database: 353 - Release Date: 1/13/04
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

"Hilton Evans" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
[..] Aside from slashdot pontificaters, what's the evidence?
eWeek? <VBG>
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

"Hilton Evans" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
When you go into an electronics or computer retailer, do you
see Linux PCs? I don't even see them at Walmart, and Walmart
sells $199 Lindows PCs. Aside from slashdot pontificaters, what's
the evidence?
Who needs evidence when you have trashdot from slashdot? Some people just
can't get enough of being proven wrong ... year after year after year.
Red Hat should know the Linux market better than most. They seem to be
pulling back from the consumer desktop.
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

On 01/16/04 08:11 +0900, Hilton Evans wrote:
Quote
When you go into an electronics or computer retailer, do you
see Linux PCs? I don't even see them at Walmart, and Walmart
sells $199 Lindows PCs. Aside from slashdot pontificaters, what's
the evidence?
To be honest, I was totally amazed to walk into a local computer
retailer here and see a single Lindows PC being offered with a
broadband connectivity bundle. It is the first honest-to-goodness
Linux PC I've ever seen for sale. It shares showroom space with
about 80 other PCs and Macs. ;^)
All this "Year of the Linux Desktop" is SO optimistic. Blindly
so. Go to IBM's site <www.ibm.com/>and you're greeted
with the headline "Linux is Everywhere." Oh? So then why can't I
buy a ThinkPad with Linux preinstalled? D'oh! I think it's great
that Linux is getting mindshare and there's no question that it
is BEGINNING to make inroads on the desktop, but any significant
computer retailer showroom presence is still, IMO, years in the
future. I suspect it'll be 2010 before Linux has equal
"preinstalled" representation in retail showrooms as do Macs.
Frankly, with Lindows offering the only legit commercial DVD
playback software, why would the average home user want to
install Linux? Until LinDVD or PowerDVD for Linux are released to
the general unwashed masses, Linux isn't going to get more than a
passing nod.
trane
--
//------------------------------------------------------------
// Trane Francks XXXX@XXXXX.COM Tokyo, Japan
// Practice random kindness and senseless acts of beauty.
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

Hilton Evans wrote:
Quote
Jeff Undercash" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
news: XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...
>I predicted the exact same thing in this newsgroup not too long ago.
>Looks like I'm not the only one with the same belief:
>
slashdot.org/article.pl
>
>Everyone else on the planet is promoting Linux while the focus here is on
>.Net...

When you go into an electronics or computer retailer, do you
see Linux PCs? I don't even see them at Walmart, and Walmart
sells $199 Lindows PCs. Aside from slashdot pontificaters, what's
the evidence?

No one expects Linux to take over the home desktop market any time soon. The
corporate market is the Desktop market Linux is shooting for right now, not
the home market.
If you want corporate desktop PCs shipped with Linux, IBM or HP will
accomodate you quite nicely <G>.
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

"Jeff Undercash" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
I predicted the exact same thing in this newsgroup not too long ago.
Looks
like I'm not the only one with the same belief:

slashdot.org/article.pl&tid=
126&tid=163&tid=185
Quote

Everyone else on the planet is promoting Linux while the focus here is on
.Net...
Yawn... Every year seems to be the year Linux will trounce on MS. Still
waiting for the big showdown.
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

"Steve-O" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
Yawn... Every year seems to be the year Linux will trounce on MS. Still
waiting for the big showdown.
Maybe they figure it's like predicting the weather. If you say it's gonna
rain and you say it long enough, eventually you'll be right. Of course, in
the process, you'll demonstrate to most people that you really don't have a
clue.
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

Trane Francks wrote:
<snip>
Quote
install Linux? Until LinDVD or PowerDVD for Linux are released to
the general unwashed masses, Linux isn't going to get more than a
passing nod.
As if 'desktop market' is equivalent to 'home desktop market', which it is
not. How big is the percentage of corporate users that really need to watch
DVD's?
--
Ruurd
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

"Hilton Evans" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in
Quote
When you go into an electronics or computer retailer, do you
see Linux PCs?
I see such systems here from time to time. Not many, but they exist.
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

"pNichols" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message news: XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...
Quote
Hilton Evans wrote:

>Jeff Undercash" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
>news: XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...
>>I predicted the exact same thing in this newsgroup not too long ago.
>>Looks like I'm not the only one with the same belief:
>>
slashdot.org/article.pl
>>
>>Everyone else on the planet is promoting Linux while the focus here is on
>>.Net...
>
>When you go into an electronics or computer retailer, do you
>see Linux PCs? I don't even see them at Walmart, and Walmart
>sells $199 Lindows PCs. Aside from slashdot pontificaters, what's
>the evidence?
>
No one expects Linux to take over the home desktop market any time soon. The
corporate market is the Desktop market Linux is shooting for right now, not
the home market.
And, that market is probably overblown. Here in the U.S. most businesses
are small businesses. Big corporations with 10,000 desktops and 100 geek
staffs to babysit them are willing to go through the hassle to convert from
Windows to Linux; and they will get significant savings from their economies
of change.
Even in big corporations some are sufficiently compartmentalized so that
a move to a single platform makes no sense. When I was working in as
a research spectroscopist our analytical and physical chemistry departments
mostly used PCs while our synthetic chemistry department favored Macs.
And, the choice of platform on a scientific instrument was determined by
the supplier.
A small business with a couple of dozen PCs won't gain much in dollar
savings moving to Linux and stands to lose and savings on procurement
to service and training.
--
Hilton Evans
-----------------------------------------------
ChemPen Chemical Structure Software
www.chempensoftware.com
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.561 / Virus Database: 353 - Release Date: 1/13/04
 

Re:Re: 2004 - Year of Linux Desktop

"Hilton Evans" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >wrote in message
Quote
And, that market is probably overblown. Here in the U.S. most
businesses
are small businesses. Big corporations with 10,000 desktops and 100
geekstaffs to babysit them are willing to go through the hassle to
convert
from Windows to Linux; and they will get significant savings from
their
economies of change.
Companies with fewer than 100 employees make up make than 90% of the
businesses in the US.
Companies with fewer than 500 employees make up more than 99% of the
businesses in the US.